Ethical Dilemmas In Entrepreneurs

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According to BusinessDictionary.com, ethics are “the basic concepts and fundamental principles of decent human conduct. It includes study of universal values such as the essential equality of all men and women, human or natural rights, obedience to the law of land, concern for health and safety and, increasingly, also for the natural environment” (Ethics, 2015). For entrepreneurs, ethics help determine decisions on a daily basis, but ethical choices not always simple. Unethical decisions do not always present any obvious consequences, so when faced with the temptation of making more money or making money faster, it can be difficult to stay true to good intentions. Entrepreneurs typically start up their companies with a limited amount of capital.…show more content…
If fact, the most common decisions resulting in unethical practices are masked behind what appear to be ordinary courses of operations. According to Entrepreneur.com, there are five mistakes that entrepreneurs make regularly. These mistakes include: “1. You snuck a few personal expenses through the business; 2. You hired that person because you just liked him more; 3. You shipped a product to a bigger customer ahead of a smaller one; 4. You charged a customer a ton of money for only 15 minutes of work; 5. You poached an employee from a friendly competitor” (Marks, 2015). These practices may not immediately come to mind as an unethical actions because they seem insignificant. They are unethical, they are dishonest, and they can send a business into a downward…show more content…
He believes that people and the planet are just as important as profits. For him this has proven to be a very successful way of thinking. He has gone above and beyond all expectations to be eco-friendly, which is very unusual considering that Cascade Engineering is a plastics manufacturing company. He has reduced “emissions by 20 percent over a recent five-year period” (Scarborough, 2005, p. 109). He has also reduced his landfill cost by more than 90 percent since 2012. Furthermore, “Cascade’s headquarters uses 22 percent less energy than a comparably sized non-LEED building” (Scarborough, 2005, p. 109). If most companies would consider the Fred Keller’s way of thinking, the planet would be in a much better situation. (Scarborough,
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