Hobbes 's Views On Nature Essay example

Hobbes 's Views On Nature Essay example

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People often think nature supports our value judgments or claims about the goodness of human life. People argue that God has intended for all things to be good, nature will lead us towards the ultimate good. Hobbes will argue differently about nature because nature causes scarcity among resources along with competition, distrust and glory which causes violence and conflict. Hobbes does agree with the fact that the state of nature does make us all equal. Hobbes is not talking about equality in the sense that God made all people equal but in the sense that we all have the ability to kill one another. Also nature causes all men and women to have self-preservation. .According to Hobbes, despite nature not supporting justice and the greatest good does not mean people can never live under a sovereign entity that implements laws and punishments. The sovereign implements laws through fear. When there is no sovereign, people will always live in a state of war. Since nature does not provide a foundation for us to live by, the sovereign has to create it through fear of a punishment of a violent death. Since there is no greatest good, fear takes its place. According do Hobbes when there is no sovereign in place, anarchy starts to take place which makes life, nasty, brutish and short.
In the world we live in, nature provides a limited amount of supplies. The limited amount of supplies means that sources are scarce. When there is a limited amount of resources, there is not enough for everyone to have which causes a struggle for survival. Hobbes states “If any two men desire the same thing, which nevertheless they cannot both enjoy, they become enemies; and in the way to their end, which is principally their own conservation, and sometimes the...


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...of a forceful end. When there is a limited amount of resources, people distrust one another which causes them to act violently towards one another. When there is a sovereign put into place, they can evenly divide the resources among everyone which causes people not to distrust one another. Also, when there is a sovereign put into place, conflict will be limited.
In the Leviathan, Hobbes repeatedly asserts that there is no greatest good and no justice. Even though there is no justice, the sovereign can still rule through fear which is one of the primary passions. When there is laws based on fear, people will abide by them. When there is conflict due to scarcity of resources, completion, distrust and glory, there sovereign can put laws into place that will cause peace through fear. When people are fearful to break the law the sovereign sets, things will be peaceful.

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