History Of The Harlem Renaissance Essay examples

History Of The Harlem Renaissance Essay examples

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History Of The Harlem Renaissance
The Harlem Renaissance was a time where culture, social interaction, intelligence and creativity kicked off with a huge bang because of African American authors, artists, musicians, photographers, poets, and scholars says the History Channel. The Harlem Renaissance began in the year 1917 and extended to the mid-1930s but, in this time frame there were famous writers such as Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, James Weldon Johnson, Claude McKay, and many others who made this time an unforgettable moment in history says the Poetry Foundation. In the Harlem Renaissance it was more than just a culture, social and poetic movement: what it really was African Americans fighting for their rights such as civil and political but, what else they were fighting for was equality, justice and wanting the reign of suffering to end and bring the day that freedom rings. Though the Renaissance movement did not bring everyone’s attention to the matter of the injustice of the Jim Crow Laws it did lay a foundation of encouragement and moral boost to the African Americans that fought for their rights. In the Renaissance there was a substantial amount of poetry that had a typical theme that showed up in their poems such as succeeding in achieving freedom, the American dream and having an identity for them self’s instead of being marked as an outcast. The writers that show this theme commonly in their poetry is the famous Langston Hughes, Claude McKay and James Weldon Johnson.
The famous writer Langston Hughes show this theme in a poem called "I, too, am America" in this poem it talks about how the speaker is sent to the kitchen when the guest come in the whites house because of his race and appearance. Although the speak...


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In conclusion Langston Hughes, Claude McKay and James Weldon Johnson all went through similar struggles and trials but, ultimately they all had the same goal in speaking out and achieving there goal of having a country where everyone has equal rights and equal treatment. There were also many others such authors, artists, musicians, photographers, poets, and scholars who had similar ambitions and interest but, the most interesting thing in my studies that I found was that every writer and African American in the Harlem Renaissance all had the same goal, emotions, and all could tell creative and phenomenal poems and stories that were all so different in their own ways. After reading all these poems this is how these poems represent the common theme of achieving freedom, the American dream, and having an identity for them self’s instead of being marked as an outcast.

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