Urban Sprawl : A Growing Economy Essay

Urban Sprawl : A Growing Economy Essay

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INTRODUCTION

Sustainable cities, also referred to as eco-cities, are metropolises that are designed with consideration of environmental impact, inhabited by people dedicated to minimal amount of energy required such as food and water, also the minimum outputs of waste products such as heat, air pollution, carbon dioxide, methane, and water pollution. Throughout the various planning decisions that is used to design cities, it eventually leads to the high tendency of urban sprawl. Urban sprawl describes the how the human population has expanded from central urban areas into communities which are low-density, mono-functional and often heavily car-dependant. Urban sprawl is highly detested by suburban citizens, but it is far more effective for the economy as opposed to keeping people cooped up in these overpopulated metropolis’, as an expanding society, symbolizes a growing economy.
Firstly, collaboration between people is more evident as a stronger sense of community associated with urban sprawl. In less dense populated communities, the sense of belonging increases, as generally, especially associated within cities, individuals tend to get lost within the crowd. Additionally, suburban areas have significantly newer, and more updated infrastructure as opposed to the city’s core. Secondly, crime rates drastically decrease in the suburbs as opposed to the inner city. Furthermore, urban sprawl is beneficial for the economy because the chance of poverty decreases in suburban communities. Majority of crimes that are committed are on the basis of a financial standpoint. The population in metropolises consists of either upper or lower class citizens, as there’s little to no median of citizens in the middle class. With urban sprawl moving...


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...rth of the City Beautiful movement.”
The 1909 Plan of Chicago marked the early stages of modern city planning which was extremely key how cities are now planned and has thoroughly shaped innovation which has resulted in the new ideas of planners, politicians, and even citizens which have been effective throughout the decade and even in the future. Additionally, it discusses the drastic transition of public control of the use of privately owned land evolved slowly, in part most subsequently due to the various constitutional questions which are involved in the issue. “Post- World War 1 suburbanization, facilitated by a rapid expansion in automobile ownership, propelled hundreds of communities into zoning and master planning (Levy 2003,248).” Regional Planning within the automobile industry also saw a drastic increase in employment as well during that same time period.

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