James Madison 's Federalist # 10 A Faction Essay

James Madison 's Federalist # 10 A Faction Essay

Length: 1479 words (4.2 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Strong Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

According to James Madison’s Federalist #10 a faction was a group of citizens, either large or small, who came together and act on common grounds for the rights of other people and/or their community. He believed that we as citizens naturally broke up into factions because of differences in opinion especially political ideology. Also Madison expressed that the distribution and collection of riches and property is so unequal that it causes the development of common faction. Although stating that factions are more of an inevitably harmful thing he does believe that they still are a way for the people to express their viewpoint to their government. Madison does argue for the control of factions, which he proposed in two ways. One of his methods are to prevent factions from arising to begin with and this can be done by placing limitations on laws for factions.
The second method was to control the effect that factions would have on the public by making them all believe in one united cause. In addition to Madison’s distaste for factions because of its affect on the public he describes the factions themselves as conniving and manipulative. Based on a pure democracy government, Madison believes that majority rights can easily overrule minority factions. Although a faction is a way for the people to be heard, if a democracy styled government remained present then not all citizens would be heard. A republican government would allow elected representatives on a regional scale to manage the public’s demands and this is what Madison was so adamantly behind.

2. Detail 2 ways interest groups influence the policymaking process
An interest group is defined as a group of people who influence changes in public policy although they do not try t...


... middle of paper ...


...of government Paterson offered up a unicameral legislature. This would give the executive branch the authority over matters on a national scale such as deals between countries and federal impeachment. While the judiciary would not have power over states they would however be represented by a supreme court. In addition to these other rulings within the New Jersey Plan, new policies would become present such as a law on how the United States gave admission to incoming states. As well as, how the citizens of the rapidly growing states would be prosecuted in light of a crime being committed. Ultimately, the Connecticut Compromise was presented to combine ideas from both the New Jersey Plan and the Virginia Plan to satisfy both the large and small states. Randolph got his proposal of a congress with two chambers while the senate agreed to equal votes as Paterson wanted.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

James Madison And The Federalist Papers

- James Madison and the Federalist Papers In the late 1700s, it was apparent that the Declaration of Independence and the Articles of Confederation did not establish the type of government needed to keep the nation together as a nation-state. The American people needed to find a more effective way to govern themselves and this was no easy feat. Most Americans had varying political thoughts in the 18th century. The challenge because how to best take care of the masses in a fair and equitable way....   [tags: United States Constitution, James Madison]

Strong Essays
1178 words (3.4 pages)

The Federalist Paper By James Madison

- James Madison wrote the federalist papers to explain the federal system should of government to the the american people. The federalist papers also introduced the idea of factions in a republican government. James Madison describes a faction as a small, organized group that forms within a larger group which is often present in politics. Republican governments are prone to factions. In order for a republican government to be successful it is important to protect against factions. Madison believed there are two ways to protect against factions;to get rid of them or control them....   [tags: United States Constitution, United States]

Strong Essays
1012 words (2.9 pages)

Federalist Paper 10, by James Madison

- The theories presented in Federalist Paper #10 by James Madison directly apply to many of the world’s utmost dilemmas. Madison’s first theory states that Factions can be very detrimental to the common, good. Madison’s second theory explains that a strong, large republic is the best form of government. Federalist Paper #10 is one essay in a series of papers written mostly by James Madison, John Jay, and Alexander Hamilton, fighting for the ratification of the United States Constitution. In Federalist Paper #10 James Madison addresses the issue of “how to guard against factions.” The definition of a faction is “a group of citizens, with interest’s contrary to the rights of others or the inter...   [tags: Theories Modern Influence]

Strong Essays
1774 words (5.1 pages)

An Analysis Of James Madison Writes 's Federalist No Essay

- James Madison writes in Federalist No. 51, “[i]n framing a government which is to be administered by men over men, the great difficulty lies in this: you must first enable the government to control the governed; and in the next place oblige it to control itself.” He goes on to explain his concept of “compound republic” in which two distinct governments (national and state) are further subdivided into separate departments. In each of the two distinct governments, the legislative, executive and judicial branches (departments) work like a scale to balance each other and prevent one from gaining too much power or influence....   [tags: Democracy, Government, Federalist Papers]

Strong Essays
973 words (2.8 pages)

Federalist No.10’s Faction and Direct Vs. In Direct Democracy Essay

- In Federalist No.10, James Madison discusses his theories about faction. In doing this, he persuades the new Constitution and how it should be enacted. He believed factions were the number one cause of the failure of the Articles of Confederation. The definition of a faction is a group of people forming a minority group within a larger group, to seek some goal within a political party or government. Madison describes faction differently in Federalist No.10, but in actuality the definitions have the same meaning....   [tags: Government ]

Strong Essays
848 words (2.4 pages)

Federalist No. 10 and No. 51 by James Madison Essay

- Federalist No. 10 and No. 51 were a series of essays written by James Madison, arguing for the ratification of the U.S Constitution. Before the ratification, the Articles of Confederation only bounded the thirteen colonies, uniting them as military alliance rather than a cohesive government. The central government lacked authority; the national government could not collect taxes or force states to comply with their laws. The lack of a strong central government made it difficult for states to operate effectively as one single nation....   [tags: thoughts of the 4th US president]

Strong Essays
1349 words (3.9 pages)

The Dangers of Factions Explained in James Madison's The Federalist No. 10

- ... Madison believes that factions are inherent to human nature, making it unavoidable that people are living under a state of liberty. Madison argues that "the most common and durable source of factions has been the various and unequal distribution of property" (Madison). I think what Madison is trying to state is that as long as people have different talents, economic statuses, and amounts of property, people will always continue to associate with others who have similar qualities as them. The difference between those who have and those who do not has always existed throughout human history, thus making it one of the most unavoidable causes of factions....   [tags: republic, tyranny, governement]

Strong Essays
514 words (1.5 pages)

An Analysis of Federalist Papers 10 and 51

- Federalist Papers 10 and 51 served to explain the union as a safeguard against factions and insurrection and to explain how the structure of this new union must encompass the ability to furnish proper checks and balances between the different departments within itself respectively. These articles contain absolutely no higher meaning concerning Plato’s beliefs of the True, Good and the Beautiful. The articles are merely rhetoric used to rationalize the benefits of a new system, explain how the new union will be constructed and most crucial to the essays, sway public opinion to support the ratification of the new constitution....   [tags: The Federalist Papers]

Strong Essays
733 words (2.1 pages)

Alexander Hamilton And James Madison Essay

- Alexander Hamilton and James Madison had faith in the ethics of the people to establish a republican government. Alexander Hamilton and James Madison did have faith in the ethics of the people to establish a republican government, for they could see that the old Federalist Government was no longer working for the people. The people had out-grown the Federalist government, and needed to become a Union. Alexander Hamilton asked the people to come join him in making a new Union. By uniting the thirteen colonies, the colonists could have more of a say in their government, and become united as a country....   [tags: United States, Democracy]

Strong Essays
1224 words (3.5 pages)

The Federalist Papers And Government Today

- The Federalist Papers and Government Today In The Federalist Papers by James Madison, Madison discuses various aspects of government and how the government must be organized in order to better represent the people. In The Federalist, No. 10 Madison discusses the nature of political factions and parties and how they can affect the government and its practices. The Federalist, No. 51 discusses instead how the government being in branches helps maintain liberties and better protect the American people....   [tags: Political party, Democracy, Federalist No. 10]

Strong Essays
1034 words (3 pages)