The Analybility Theory In Nursing's Theory Of Emotional Intelligence

1215 Words5 Pages
Developed by Mayer and Salovey, the ability theory views emotional intelligence as a skill; recognizing it as the capacity to recognize, reason, and problem solve with emotions and to allow the emotions to enhance thinking (Mayer and Salovey, 1990). The model also proposes that individuals vary in their abilities of processing emotional information and that emotions are connected to cognitions. Based on this theory, individuals are able to further develop and refine these skills using the four branches of ability, promoting both emotional and intellectual growth (Akerjordet and Severinsson, 2007). By understanding ability theory, individuals are able to improve their emotional processing and recognition needed for high emotional intelligence…show more content…
This branch consists of all of the other components of the theory, containing the belief that when an individual is able to understand and perceive emotion, they will be able to manage their emotions as well. The emotionally intelligent individual is able to control and remain open to emotional signals, as well as regulate their emotions based on their personal and social goals (Mayer, Salovey, and Caruso, 2011). This concept was depicted in a study of nurses and their ability to manage their emotions during work, as well as when they were off duty. Donoso et al. (2015) collected data from 53 nurses working in various units of a hospital. Participants were asked to complete the Difficulty of Emotion Regulation Scale, the Emotional Labor Scale, the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, and the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale at the end of their work day for five days. Results concluded that emotional demands and the ability to regulate emotions had positive effects on motivation and well being. The nurses who had higher emotional regulation abilities were able to separate their work and home environment which was related to psychological and emotional well-being (Donoso, Demerouti, Hernáández, Moreno-Jiménez, and Cobo, 2015). This study demonstrated the positive aspects of emotional intelligence, job satisfaction, and the ability to regulate emotion to enhance emotional…show more content…
Though many instruments have been developed, the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) continues to be the most widely used assessment testing for emotional ability (Cardoso, Ellenbogen, and Linnen, 2014). Roberts et al. (2006), wanted to reassess the validity of the MSCEIT against other measures of emotion research and intelligence. 138 participants completed a biographical questionnaire, the MSCEIT, the Index of Vocal Emotion Recognition (Vocal-I), the Japanese and Caucasian Brief Affect Recognition Test (JACBART), as well as the Vocabulary, Letter-Number Sequencing, and Matrix Reasoning from the WAIS-III to determine relationships among the measures. Results found that the MSCEIT was related to other measures of intelligence, meeting an important criterion for demonstrating ability emotional intelligence as a form of intelligence (Roberts, Schulze, O’Brien, MacCann, Reid, and Maul, 2006). The study also confirmed the distinction between the two components of the MSCEIT, the experiential and strategic emotional intelligence sections which inhabit the four branches of the model. This study suggests the validity and promotes the use of the MSCEIT in determining emotion recognition and emotional intelligence as an ability (Roberts, et al.,
Open Document