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Gender Recognition Essay

argumentative Essay
1355 words
1355 words
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Gender recognition is one of the first cognitive developments in a toddler. Many scholars from both the sciences and humanities have been very interested in trying to the origin of gender recognition within toddlers and the effects it has on developing social lives. Some scientist have determined that gender is not something that is “hardwired” into your brain (Elliot, 1), it is a trait that is learned through experience and how one is raised. Toddlers learn their roles they take on in their playgroups, as either boys or girls, from their interaction with the influential adults in their lives and the limited social experiences they have encountered.
“Knowledge about one’s own sex and the sex of others may influence behavior” (Campbell, 8). Some scientist have concluded that children begin to “categorize themselves and objects and characteristics to girl or boy within their first 24 months of life” (Freeman, 357). This is when the child will start distinguishing what is similar or different from them and the concept of “‘mine’ and ‘not yours’” comes into play (Levine, 456). After this has developed, toddlers will begin to expand their gender-specific play preferences within the first 36 months of their lives. This shows that a complicated and fully developed mind is not necessary to obtain an understanding of the social structure of one’s society. “Both gender identity and sex differences in behavior broadly emerge in the first three to four years of life” (Campbell, 1). This means that by age three, children already have already confined themselves to the limited and rigid restrictions of their gender. The effects manifest in various ways depending on the child.
Color is the most influential part of a young child’...

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...ouraging boys to explore, while positively responding to girls request for help” (Levine, 456). This creates girls who are good communicators and very emotionally aware, but not always very self-sufficient. Some of these traits show up in the conflicts that are inevitable when play is involved. One of the biggest recent discoveries is “children.., as young as four years old,.. use social ostracism and other, relatively subtle manipulative tactics that are intended to damage another’s self esteem or social standing” (Ostrov, 256). This is such a miraculous finding because it shows that children are able to execute indirect aggression earlier than they did decades ago showing that the aggression in children is shifting from physical to a more mental onslaught. Since “boys emphasize dominance whereas girls emphasize intimacy”, they handle their aggression differently.

In this essay, the author

  • Explains that gender recognition is one of the first cognitive developments in a toddler and the effects it has on developing social lives.
  • Concludes that children begin to categorize themselves and objects and characteristics to girl or boy within their first 24 months of life.
  • Explains that color is the most influential part of a young child's life. it is also the first separation of gender infants will experience. some researchers suggest that the color assignment has created "a preference for these familiar colours as they grow older."
  • Argues that color preference is biological, but there is a large number of research that proves otherwise.
  • Explains the shift in gender-specific toys for girls in the past 50 years. girls are more likely to be encouraged to do things that were once considered masculine.
  • Concludes that the older the children were, the more interactions they had with more adults and children due to their schooling age.
  • Explains that children's literature is how they learn values, morals, and some of the processes of life. companies have found very gender-based ways to capitalize on the developing gender understanding of children.
  • Argues that the system of gender marketing will not be changed until the idea of 'gender confinement' is removed from society.
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