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    Use of Humor by Woody Allen and Sigmund Freud

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    and its effect on both the humorist and his or her listener, Freud and Allen share many concepts of the inner workings and overall process of comedy and wit. This agreement is especially apparent when considering the quality of Jewish humor and the characteristics of the Jewish comedian. Freud’s Conception of the Nature of Humor When Freud produced The Joke and Its Relation to the Unconscious, the discipline of psychoanalysis was in its beginning stages. The Joke was the final work in a series of

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    Freedom is Not Free in Bread Givers

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    American culture and retaining her cultural heritage. "Richard F. Shepard asserted in the New York Times that Yezierska’s people…did not want to find themselves. They wanted to lose themselves and find America" (Gale Database 8). Rachel and Sara, the main characters, move ahead by employing the America motto of hard work will pay off. The problem for both is losing their Jewish identity in the process. Yezierska, like the female characters, experienced the loneliness of separation from the Jewish people

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    formal proclamation of Israel as an independent state, religious and political leaders had to reach a compromise that would guarantee the freedoms of all future inhabitants of the state. In the Status Quo Agreement, written by David Ben-Gurion for the Jewish Agency, Ben-Gurion reluctantly appeals to the Ultra-Orthodox/Haredi leadership in Israel through drafting specific compromises in which religion and politics would operate cooperatively. These negotiations included the Sabbath, kashrut, marital affairs

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    Israel, the place call the holy land, the land, which Jesus walked, however, it is widely acknowledged that tensions between secular and religious sectors constitute a salient feature of Israeli society. If one were to try to summarize the relationship of Israel to Jewish religion, he would say that it is related but not equivalent to certain concepts of Israel. Most people think of the holy land when they hear the names Israel but one must ask the question is Israel truly the holy land. This

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    Hirsch And The Horeb

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    look at the non- Jews and compare their Jewish ideals and beliefs. Many Jews who grew up with secular values started to look at Judaism questioningly since they started to put Judaism up to the light of secular values. The reform movement tried to bring together Judaism with general studies and in doing so would make changes to Judaism in order to accommodate the general secular knowledge. The reform movement caused many Jews to feel as though being Jewish was a burden and everything worthwhile was

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    Zionism and cultural Zionism. Both political and cultural Zionism sought to return the Jewish people to the Land of Israel, and viewed the formation of a Jewish state as a solution to improve the status and address the needs of Jews. However, political Zionism aimed to foster the equal treatment of Jews, whereas cultural Zionism focused on the spiritual revival of Jewish culture through the creation of a Jewish state. These divergent approaches can be attributed to the political and social contexts

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    immigrants, her culture is a combination of the cultures of other countries. Should these immigrants isolate themselves from the mainstream American culture, or should they sacrifice the culture of their homelands for the benefits American culture has to offer?  Judaism in particular has had to deal with the assimilation question.  One of the world’s oldest religions, it has remained strong over its six thousand year history by remaining distinct – and isolated – from other cultures. Chaim Potok focuses

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    Sunny and Shia Fundamentalism

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    fundamentalism: religious and secular. Obviously, religious fundamentalism tends to stem off from ideals in an existing religion like Christianity and secular fundamentalism is not affiliated to any religion whatsoever. An example of a secular group is The New Atheist who attempt to prove worldly questions through science. The difference between these two forms will be later discussed in this paper in much more detail. Another way to better understand what defines both religious and secular fundamentalism is

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    important because it created the base for a new, secular Jewish society and culture to emerge again with their own language and a new social identity. This new social identity meant that there was a nationalistic movement toward having a common language, literature, and cultural heritage. However, the reason why the Hebrew and Yiddish language lagged in the first place was due to Nazism and Stalinism. These two totalitarian empires wiped out the Yiddish culture since the Jews were not the majority population

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    The Success of Judaism

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    response to the pressures of modernity. Judaism has endured the challenges imposed upon it, by its ability to preserve deep-rooted traditions of the past. It is through maintaining customs from preceding times that defines the foundations of modern day Jewish practice, be it through observance, prayer or habit. In combination to this, its capacity to be versatile and incorporate outside influence has served to maintain its popularity as a major world faith. In order to continue its future religious success

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