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    And, Parrenas, Maher &Pahar, and Rushdie there is an overall theme of identity in diaspora. Regarding identity, Stuart Hall argues that, “instead of thinking of identity as an already accomplished fact, which the new cultural practices then represent, we should think, as a “'production', which is never complete, always in process, and always constituted within, not outside, representation.” (Hall 222) In other words, identity is not stagnant, but active and forever changing. Moreover, that cultural

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    woman who grew up in the south. (Dice 1=5, Dice 2=3, Dice 3=2) My new identity is an Asian American baby boomer woman. I know very little about my new identity, except that I would have lived during World War II and Pearl Harbor here in America and probably encountered harsh treatment. During that time, Asian Americans were looked down upon because of the Asian countries’ roles in the war. The stereotypes associated with my new identity include service type people such as laundry or cleaning maids and

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    develop a new identity in order to suit the community around them. I have experienced of transforming into a different person by establishing a new identity when I moved to the United States and study in the Diablo Valley College. Moreover, I have transformed to be a responsible and became a person with stronger psychology, which are my new identities. Every person needs happiness in their life to make their life meaningful and unforgettable. As the result of that, I will use my new identity combine

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    individual identities in relation to the larger national identity. Even before America won its independence from Britain, Americans struggled with this concept. Look at Jonathan Edwards’s Personal Narrative, written in 1739, or The Autobiography by Benjamin Franklin, written in 1791. Edwards is looking at his relationship to God, other Americans, and the land itself, wondering what is the best way to serve all three oft these entities. Franklin is attempting to create an identity for himself

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    New Growing Trend: Identity Theft

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    have been a victim of identity theft or not, the author of the article “Identity Theft Is a Growing Danger” has educated a neutral audience about the different ways identities are stolen. Overall, the article used pathos effectively to support the identity theft claim by capturing quotes from actual identity theft victims and the author utilized scare tactics to inform the neutral audience about the various ways that identity theft can happen and to help protect their identity on and offline. Based

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    Religion, Sexuality, and Identity in the New South A long line forms at Our Way Café in Decatur, Georgia as customers are anxious to buy a plate heaping with traditional Southern food. If one were to observe the employees and those in line, one might notice that a diverse group patronizes this restaurant. There are men in business suits, men in gas station jump suits, women with huge diamond earrings, and women in sweats. Blacks, whites, young, old, Hispanics, and many gays eat and work at

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    Aldous Huxley wrote the novel Brave New World based on the future dealing with individuality and displacement. Aldous displays this through the character of john with the use of symbolism allegory, and imagery. John’s experience with exile is normal in the beginning of the novel because he has been going through it his whole life, but this later turns into a deeper feelings of self hatred loneliness and a disappointment in himself and The New World State. This is ironic because The Director tries

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    The Romantic era’s new “American identity” was realized by the 18th-century’s literary, social, and artistic push for the creation of a culture that was unique to American society and the expansionist urge to expand America’s political realm of power. This was achieved with the influence of manifest destiny and expansionism, the emergence of transcendentalism and transcendentalist literature, and the identity of the American man being characterized by the traits of the “common man”, and the exploration

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    Jane Elton's Identity Conflict in Catherine Maria Sedgwick’s A New England Tale In her article “‘But is it any good?’: Evaluating Nineteenth-Century American Women’s Fiction,” Susan Harris provides methods and criteria for examining Women’s Fiction in what she calls “process analysis” (45). To apply Harris’ guidelines to Catherine Maria Sedgwick’s A New England Tale, I must first “acknowledge the ideological basis of [my] endeavor” (45) as a feminist/equalitist critique of the text. Furthermore

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    "Community, Identity, Stability.” In Huxley’s Brave New World, these three words hang in a sign over the Central London Hatchery and Conditioning Centre, which creates and conditions new human life. Brave New World is an altar-universe that values multiple things that our society deems odd. Knowledge is an important aspect in a hard worker, leaders, and for a fair and just society. When knowledge is no longer desired in a society, that society becomes a society of no individuality, relationships

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