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    Horace Mann

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    	Horace Mann was the father of the American School System. Horace Mann’s had many reforms on education. He was born in 1796. Mann determined what the purpose of education should be based on his own experience and observation. Mann also had many ideas how education could be improved. Many of these ideas have been followed by schools today as well. Mann also had ideas on topics which one considers today to be controversial. The public should take into account what Mann’s ideas were on these issues

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    Horace Mann Analysis

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    Orestes Brownson engaged in open opposition of Horace Mann’s vast reform policies of the Massachusetts State Board of Education. He directly opposed Mann’s work in Massachusetts on the formation of a centralized, state run school board on the grounds that state power over the educational process would result in biased and undemocratic instruction lending favor to one political interest group or another. In addition, Brownson held the belief that the state normal schools produced relatively uninformed

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    Horace Mann Beliefs

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    Horace Mann was a lawyer, Massachusetts Senator, and the first secretary of the state board of education. He is responsible for the creation of Normal schools. The first normal school was opened in Lexington, Massachusetts in the year 1839. Through this action, other states began to establish free public schools. The school provided general knowledge courses and course in pedagogy. Horace Mann efforts led to the establishments of free, public, locally controlled elementary schools. In addition, to

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    Essay On Horace Mann

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    Horace Mann Essay By Zachary Lopez 1st Period Horace Mann was the most major reformist for The Education System in The United States Of America and is most known for doing that exactly. Let's take a look on the life of Horace Mann. Horace Mann, also known as "The Father Of American Education", was born in Franklin, Massachusetts in 1796. Mann's own school had only lasted in short and brief times only lasting about a eight to ten week span. This made his drive for more longer, lasting education.

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    American Education in the 1800's

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    American Education in the 1800's In the early 1800’s education in America grew and developed rapidly, largely because of the works of three very important men: Noah Webster, William McGuffey, and Horace Mann. These three men were catalysts for the growth of education throughout the nineteenth century, and without them the large strides America took during this time would not have occurred. These great men all shared one goal: to educate the youth of America as well as possible. This was no small

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    Known as the Father of the Common School, Mann believed that to have a better, more intelligent society that citizens should be educated in even the most rural and poor of communities. Having schools that were public and paid by taxes was, “central to good citizenship, democratic participation and societal well-being,” (Horace Mann). The secretary of the Massachusetts board of education, Mann stated that political stability and social harmony depended on education,

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    Public Education: Funding based Upon Race

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    oppression of their fellow men…But I mean that it gives each man the independence and the means by which he can resist the selfishness of other men. It does better than to disarm the poor of their hostility toward the rich: it prevents being poor. –Horace Mann, 1848 Public education in the United States is exalted as the “great equalizer.” This utopian concept would be true if the education provided to all citizens was equal. Unfortunately, the dueling principles upon which the American nation was

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    Horace Mann had many different ideas that helped improve, and form the foundation for American education. Some people in society might disagree, nevertheless majority agreed to his views on education. He believed that depending on a person’s education they would be better off in their lifetime. He stated that the lack of knowledge is the reason for conflict. For example as the gap between the rich and he poor widens it will cause more conflict because the lack of education in society. He pointed

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    it the caring nature that inspires students to learn? Or is it the teachings itself that drive students to learn more? Horace Mann, the father of education, had theories of his own on what makes a worthy teacher and a successful learning environment. He believed that knowledge was a powerful tool that should be given to everyone and that knowledge was an equalizer for mankind. Mann also argued that a good teacher, ought to fit very specific criteria in order to be successful. Overall, I agree with

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    However, I do agree with definite points of individual philosophers and have decided to create my own portrait of what an educated man (or woman) would 'look' like. I start with the heart of Horace Mann because his heart was in the right place. He believed that everyone should be enrolled in school. Mann thought that the common school experience was something all students should be involved in and his propositions included the female sex, which was an outrageous stance for him to take in his era

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