Free Euripedes Essays and Papers

Sort By:
Satisfactory Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Powerful Essays
Best Essays

Free Euripedes Essays and Papers

Page 1 of 5 - About 43 essays
  • Better Essays

    The Importance of the Role That the Chorus Plays in Euripedes’ Medea The Chorus is very much an important part of Euripedes’ Medea, and indeed many other works written in the ancient Greek style. In this play, it follows the journey Medea makes, and not only narrates, but commentates on what is happening. Euripedes uses the Chorus as a literary device to raise certain issues, and to influence where the sympathies of the audience lie. In the list of characters at the beginning of the play, the

    • 1154 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Shakespeare's Macbeth and Euripedes' Medea

    • 2624 Words
    • 6 Pages
    • 1 Works Cited

    Shakespeare's Macbeth and Euripedes' Medea Shakespeare's Macbeth, and Euripedes' Medea, are both tragic plays in the classical sense. Both Medea and Macbeth lust for the unattainable, and that lust destroys them. It cannot be said which character is a truly tragic figure, because both fit the description. However, if either character deserves more sympathy it is Madea, the jilted wife, not Macbeth the King killer. Macbeth's lust for power and his willingness to please his wife leads to his downfall

    • 2624 Words
    • 6 Pages
    • 1 Works Cited
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Comparing the Themes of Vincenzio Bellini’s Norma and Euripedes' Medea Vincenzio Bellini’s opera Norma is considered by many to be a reworking of Euripedes' classic Greek tragedy Medea. Both plots have many identical elements of Greek tragedy such as a chorus, unity of location, and a human decision and action culminating in tragedy. Richard Wagner greatly admired Greek tragedies, believing them to be “The highest point ever reached in human creative achievement…” (Wagner 1). In his essay Theories

    • 3067 Words
    • 7 Pages
    • 10 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Euripedes' The Bacchae and Shakespeare's Henry V In Euripedes' The Bacchae and Shakespeare's Henry V, both writers create the character of a king who faces a challenge. Both young men have newly taken the throne and try to prove themselves as worthy kings. Henry confronts overcoming the reputation of the unconstructive behavior of his youth while Pentheus believes people should respect him as a king simply because he is king. While each man handles his problem with his own measures, Pentheus

    • 664 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 2 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Medea

    • 2047 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Title of work- Medea Country/Culture- Greek Literary Period- Classical Type of literature (genre)- Drama/Tragedy Author- Euripedes Authorial information- Euripedes lived from ca. 485 to ca. 406 B.C. making him younger thank Aeschylus and Sophocles, and making him the last of the great writers of tragedy in the golden age of Athens. His emphasis on human emotions and the psychology of individuals has proven more widely popular than philosophical beliefs shown in his older contemporary works. Medea

    • 2047 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    play. While Euripedes is required to answer specific challenges made by Dionysus to Greek society, Soyinka attempts to trace Dionysian influences into the future, beyond the existence of an historically bound god or culture. Soyinka is more attentive to the transcendent qualities which separate Dionysus from all others. By examining this first conflict in each play, it may be possible to determine how (if at all) Soyinka expands the ethical dilemma first created by Euripedes. In Euripedes' play, Pentheus

    • 793 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 2 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Medea And Othello

    • 1557 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Two tragedies from two different time period, Medea and Othello show similarities and differences in their characters, story plots and settings. Euripedes’ Medea written in the classical period and Shakespeare’s Othello written in the romantic era, the two tragedies shows different feel of what tragedies are. First of all, the most obvious difference between these two play is how Medea shows unities (time, place and action) whilst Othello has none. It’s clearly shown in the first scene, as soon

    • 1557 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    A Friendly Enemy

    • 511 Words
    • 2 Pages

    A Friendly Enemy "Death is my wish for myself, my enemies, my children" (Euripedes translated by Robinson Jeffers, Medea 11). Medea is hungry for death. She wants to taste it on her lips and wishes others to do the same. The value which Medea gives death is to use it as a weapon against her enemies. On the other hand, the women and the nurse fear death. Death,to the women and to the nurse is something that should not be wished for. "O shining sky, divine earth, Harken not to the song that this woman

    • 511 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The Death Penalty

    • 619 Words
    • 2 Pages

    what they have already done. It's unclear that the murderer has the same right to live as their victim. " Our ancestors... purged their guilt by banishment, not death. And by so doing they stopped that endless vicious cycle of murder and revenge." (Euripedes, Orestes 408 B.C.) By 1500 in England only major felonies carried the death penalty. Reform of the death penalty began in Europe by the 1750's. By the 1850's these reform efforts bore fruit. Michigan first abolished the death penalty in 1847. Various

    • 619 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    however was not a problem -- the problem was that the Greeks knew, in their hearts, that this was wrong.  Indeed, their playwrights harangued them about it from the stage of Athens continually.  All of the great Grecian playwrights -- Sophocles, Euripedes, Aristophenes -- dealt with the women's issue. All of them argued, in their various ways, that the women of Greece were not nearly as incapable and weak as the culture believed them to be.  All of them created female characters of strength and

    • 917 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
Previous
Page12345