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The Symbolism Behind Parents and Children in Mythology

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The bond between parents and children is something that was created soon after the first man was created. Unlike certain animals, whose children go off and fend for themselves right after birth, the care given to children by human parents is different. As humans, parents care and provide for their child until he/she is ready to live on their own. It is during this process of caring, that the true relationship between parents and their children form. The antiquity of parent child relationships is seen through Greek/Roman mythology. At first, myths seem to be an ordinary story, but when carefully looked at, they have a far deeper meaning. Understanding the deeper meaning of the myth is key in understanding the purpose of the myth. The purpose of myths can be to enhance the nationalistic spirit of a group of people, or teach a culture. Either way, many of the Greek/Roman myths involve the relationship between parents and children as a part of the story. Although the relationship between parents and children in Greek/Roman mythology can be used to understand many different aspects of the Greek/Roman culture, these Greek/Roman myths display symbolism through the parent child relationship such as, motherly love, female control/power in the relationship, and the fear of overtaken/ losing control by males. It is often said that a mother’s love is the most affectionate love and a love that can not be matched by anyone else; this symbol of motherly love is commonly seen throughout many of the parent child relationships in Greek/Roman mythology. The myth Demeter and Persephone, written by Homer, who is also known for the epic poem The Odyssey, clearly shows motherly love through the relationship between Demeter and her daughter Persephone ... ... middle of paper ... ...When looking at Greek/Roman myths, one is able to learn more about the inner workings of the parent child relationship. Works Cited Rosenberg, Donna. “Demeter and Persephone.” World Mythology An Anthology of the Great Myths and Epics. New York: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, 2001. 94-99. Rosenberg, Donna. “Jason and the Golden Fleece.” World Mythology An Anthology of the Great Myths and Epics. New York: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, 2001. 171-200. Rosenberg, Donna. “Medea.” World Mythology An Anthology of the Great Myths and Epics. New York: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, 2001. 213-241. Rosenberg, Donna. “Pyramus and Thisbe.” World Mythology An Anthology of the Great Myths and Epics. New York: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, 2001. 249. Rosenberg, Donna. “The Creation of the Titans and the Gods.” World Mythology An Anthology of the Great Myths and Epics. New York: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, 2001. 84-88.