Free Equal Rights Amendment Essays and Papers

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Free Equal Rights Amendment Essays and Papers

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    Equal Rights Amendment

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    event that has impacted our society in a major way and had its challenges is the Equal Rights Amendment. So the article I chose is titled The Equal Rights Amendment Passes Congress, but Fails to Be Ratified. In 1923, the equal rights amendment was introduced into the United States. This happened after women were granted the right to vote by the Nineteenth Amendment. However, the challenge of the equal rights amendment had gained very little support, to which labor unions were not in support of it

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    The Equal Rights Amendment "Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex." In 1923, this statement was admitted to Congress under the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA). The ERA was a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution granting equality between men and women under the law. If the Era was passed, it would have made unconstitutional any laws that grant one sex different rights than the other. However

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    Equal Rights Amendment

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    The Equal Rights Amendment, 1972-1872 Alice Paul and the National Woman's Party first introduced the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) to Congress in 1923. From its inception, the amendment had been meant to end "special privileges" that women were afforded by the law and to build equality between the sexes. In the 1950s, support for the amendment would grow with Presidents such as Eisenhower within their ranks. In 1963, President Kennedy's Commission on the Status of Women would state that an amendment

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    for many decades to receive the same rights as men. The feminist movement in the 1970’s was accelerated by women who were tired of being second rate citizens. Women took many strides during the 1970’s including the push for the approval of the equal rights amendment, protests, and workplace strikes just to name a few. Despite the failure of the equal rights amendment’s passing, women were not deterred and continued their struggle to receive the same rights as men. The persistent fight for equality

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    When the Equal Rights Amendment was first introduced, in 1923, it was just a few years after the 19th amendment had been passed. It continued to be reintroduced every year for the next 48 years without any success. The ERA had no major union backing it until the 1970’s, it lacked the support of the President’s Commission on the Status of Women, and even the National Organization for Women did not endorse the ERA at its founding. In The fact that the Equal Rights Amendment was introduced every year

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    Pros and Cons of the Equal Rights Amendment The Equal Rights Amendment began its earliest discussions in 1920. These discussions took place immediately after two-thirds of the states approved women's suffrage. The nineteenth century was intertwined with several feminist movements such as abortion, temperance, birth control and equality. Many lobbyists and political education groups formed in these times. One such organization is the Eagle Forum, who claims to lead the pro-family movement. On the

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    The Future of the Equal Rights Amendment

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    justice, and to have that right in our constitution," stated former First Lady Lady Bird Johnson (Eisler and Hixson 419). Presently, half of our nation is not protected under the Constitution (Eisler and Hixson 419). The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) was proposed in 1923 when Alice Paul concluded that women, although they had the right to vote, were not specifically protected from sexual discrimination by the Constitution. Seventy-five years have passed since the amendment was first introduced, and

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    Plan of Investigation This investigation addresses the following question: How important was Phyllis Schlafly’s role in the defeat of the U.S. Equal Rights Amendment? In order to evaluate her importance, this investigation will address several factors that contributed to the defeat of the ERA, such as the negative portrayal of women by the press, the decriminalization of abortion, the split between feminists who wanted the ERA to pass and those who believed that its passage would lead to the deterioration

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    for Equal Rights Amendment, was an amendment that was designed to guarantee equal rights for women. It was a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution and was originally written by Alice Paul and Crystal Eastman. Both Paul and Eastman believed that in order to have freedom from legal sex discrimination, it was required to have an Equal Rights Amendment that would affirm the equal application of the Constitution to all U.S. citizens. In the year of 1923, the Equal Rights Amendment was introduced

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    States government should pass an Equal Rights Amendment to guarantee equality for both men and women. Ever since the currently Proposed Equal Rights Amendment was created, there has been conflict about weather or not it should be approved. For almost a century, the side that supports the amendment have fought to get it officially put in place. One person writes, “Since 1923, activists have been trying to pass the Equal Rights Amendment, which states, ‘Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied

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