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    Constitutional Democracy

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    Constitutional Democracy The basic premise of a constitutional democracy is that government has rules and all of the people have voices. Through free and fair elections we elect candidates to represent us. The Constitution of the United States guarantees us the right to do this, and to live democratically. The framers attacked tyrannical government and advanced the following ideas: that government comes from below, not from above, and that it derives its powers from the consent of the governed;

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    What is constitutional democracy, and how does it function in the United States? First in foremost the constitution of the United States is made up of twenty-seven amendments. The first ten amendments are known as the Bill of Rights. James Madison drafted the Bill of Rights; it was put in effect on December 15, 1791. Our founding fathers created this to ensure the protection of the people in America, thus forming a democracy amongst the citizens of the United States. Constitutional democracy is revolved

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    Garber Government Professor Sharifian March 9, 2017 1. 1 Explain the origin and development of constitutional democracy in the united states. The scenes in creation being intellectual, the put together of constitutional democracy was very empirical. The Constitutional Convention was convened to formulate the constitution. What had to be clear was that the only way to assure a functioning constitutional democracy was the public's discussion. In philadelphia the delegates compromised. The outcome was to

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    Rawls' Concept Of Justice As Political: A Defense Against Critics ABSTRACT: Rawls' theory of justice as fairness involves a central contention that principles of justice essential to the structure of a constitutional democracy must be viewed as political in contrast to more comprehensive moral, philosophical or religious doctrines. The concept of justice is not its being true to an antecedent moral order and given to us, but its being congruent with our self-understanding within the history

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    John Rawls and Political Liberalism

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    do these concepts help to preserve stability within a pluralistic society? John Rawls book, Political Liberalism, addresses the need for the reformation of the unjust democratic constitutional regime. According to Rawls, “there is at present no agreement on the way the basic institutions of constitutional democracy should be arranged if they are to satisfy the fair terms of cooperation between citizens regarded as free and equal,” (Rawls 4). In the real world, individuals all follow their own

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    Constitutional Politics

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    Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights were written, these documents still continue to shape American political culture. The Constitution seems to be the most powerful of American historical documents, giving rise to a constitutional politics in which every aspect of the document plays a vital role. The most heated political debates are often over the constitutionality, or lack thereof, concerning the issue in question. Differing interpretations of the Constitution allow for

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    A constitutional right?

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    A constitutional Right? Carl T Bogus, the author of a 1992 article, “ The Strong Case for Gun Control”, explains to the reader of the importance and relevance of tougher and more strict gun control laws in local governments today. Bogus begins by telling of the recent rise in school shootings and violent crimes in the united states. He explains that in 1998, more than four thousand children were killed by guns, and it took a string of school related shootings to bring that fact to the attention

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    deserve neither liberty nor safety," says Benjamin Franklin in Historical Review of 1759. Others tend to say just the opposite of what Ben Franklin quoted. With that being said, a key question comes up for discussion: Does the government have the Constitutional power to suspend the Constitution during a time of crisis? Certain documents were brought up for discussion that deal with certain articles from the Constitution and some acts/laws that the Congress passed to substantiate whether the government

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    Hate Crime Laws: Are They Constitutional?

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    Are hate crime penalty enforcement laws constitutional? “That’s Gay.” If you are around teenagers today, that is a phrase you will most likely hear very often. It is not necessarily meant as a homophobic or hate-filled remark, and most of the time it is referring to an object, an idea, or a conversation; things that obviously have no sexual orientation. But now, according to a bill passed by the senate, it could almost be considered a hate crime. Many people support the widening of hate crime laws

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    Hegel and the Russian Constitutional Tradition ABSTRACT: This paper advances the idea that Russian constitutionalism developed through a reinterpretation of Russian history in terms of Hegel's concept of the World Spirit. Russians implicitly viewed their nation as the embodiment of Hegel's World Spirit, which would have a unique messianic mission for humanity. However, the specifics of Russia's historical development diverged from Hegel's critical stage of ethical development, in which individuals

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