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    Abortion, the UNFPA and the China Syndrome The Founding Charter of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) says "couples have the right to decide the number and spacing of their children." Rarely have words rung so hollow. For more than two decades, UNFPA has been strongly supportive of China's brutally coercive "one child per family" policy. In a letter last year to Bill Richardson, UNFPA Executive Director Nafis Sadik tacitly admits that China has used and continues to use population control

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    The China Syndrome

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    In the film the China Syndrome, directed by James Bridges, we follow Kimberly Wells a news reporter played by Jane Fonda, covering fluff stories. Until, she gets the opportunity to go inside a nuclear power plant. In the midst of the tour Kimberly and her camera man Richard Adams, played by Michael Douglas, encounter a mechanical fail, in the hands of the power plant controller Jack Godell, played by Jack Lemon. After realizing, the Richard had gotten the entire incident on tape, Kimberly makes it

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    Progeria - Hutchinson-Gilford Syndrome

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    Progeria, otherwise known as Hutchinson-Gilford syndrome is an extremely rare, genetic childhood disorder with a reported incidence of about one in a million. Hutchinson reported the syndrome in 1886 when he found the first patient with Progeria. In 1904 Gilford described a second case of Progeria, thus creating the term to reflect the syndrome’s senile features. There are only about a hundred reported cases since the disorder has been discovered over a century ago. Currently, there are about thirty

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    Guillain-Barre Syndrome

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    Guillain-Barre Syndrome Guillain-Barre Syndrome, or acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, is a self-limiting disease characterized by areflexia and acute progressive motor weakness of at least one limb. Other symptoms include motor weakness of the extremities and face, loss or reduction of deep tendon reflexes, decreased sensation throughout the body,ophthalmoplegia, and ataxia. In severe cases respiratory failure and autonomic dysfunction may occur. Respiratory failure results from

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    Jouubert Syndrome Essay

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    chance of inheriting one abnormal gene. This would make you a carrier. There has always been confusion surrounding exactly what a "Related Disorder” is in relation to Joubert Syndrome. In order to clarify this, the evolution of Joubert syndrome in the medical world needs to be understood. The history of Joubert Syndrome is a complex, rich journey. In 1969 Dr. Marie Joubert came across a family with more than one child showing similar symptoms which included abnormal eye movements, ataxia, and retardation

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    Brownsville, she was sent to Driscoll Hospital in Corpus Christie within a couple of weeks. While being in the care at the hospital, medical doctors diagnosed Janelle with Prader-Willi Syndrome. As you can imagine, so many questions and thoughts went through her parent’s minds. To start, what is Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS)? According to Genetic Home Reference, PWS is a complex genetic condition that affects many parts of the body, such as muscle tone, insatiable appetite, intellectual impairment, and

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    Autosomal Chromosomal Abnormalities

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    Evans-Martin, F. (2009). Genes and Disease Down Syndrome. New York, New York. Chelsea House, Infobase publishing Martini, H., Nath, J., & Bartholomew, E., (2012). Fundamentals of Anatomy and Physiology 9th edition, California, Pearson Publishing Massimini, K. (2000). Genetic Disorders sourcebook 2nd edition, Michigan, Omnigraphics Mayoclinic staff. (Aug 17, 2010). Triple X Syndrome. Retrieved from http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/triple-x-syndrome Santrock, J. (2011). Life-Span Development 13th

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    Shaking Baby Syndrome

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    Shaken Baby Syndrome Imagine yourself as a sweet, innocent, precious little baby. You are totally dependant upon adults to give you what you need and most importantly love. Your only means of communication is crying so you cry when you need to be fed, when you need your diaper changed, when you aren’t feeling so well, or when you just want some attention. You are crying and someone comes over to you. They pick you up, but instead of holding you and comforting you, talking affectionately to you,

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    Treatment for Raynaud’s - 2 - Introduction Raynaud syndrome is an auto-immune disorder in which blood vessels in the digits constrict. It usually strikes females between the ages of eighteen and thirty. “Between three to five percent of people are affected.” (Harvard, 2003) There is no known cause or cure. (Segala et al, 2003) Clinical features primarily deal with (but are not limited to) the digits of the fingers. Other digits that may be affected include toes, nose, and ear lobes. Exposure to cold

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    Overview Of Deafness

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    to be a large factor. Non genetic factors (i.e. maternal infection, prematurity or postnatal infection) may cause 40-50% of the remaining hearing loss. About one-third of children with hereditary deafness have features that are part of a genetic syndrome and there are between 300-400 different forms of genetic deafness that are known. Most children benefit from a genetic evaluation as a dominant diagnostic tool in determining the exact cause of the deafness, and the role of the audiologist is pivitol

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