Free British Politics Essays and Papers

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    British government and politics has evolved greatly throughout its formation and to its modern glory. The path taken by British rulers has paved the road for parliamentary democracy in Britain today. From the signing of the Magna Carta to the common law practiced in Great Britain today, British government is always evolving due to its people, leaders, and culture. The rational-legal authority practiced in Britain was created gradually through many important people and signing of documents. Several

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    Britain is a liberal, parliamentary and stable democracy, where its dynamic society conditions the agenda of politics. The fusion/separation, or lack thereof, of powers is complicated, but essentially includes the Executive and Elected Legislature, Appointed Legislature, the Judiciary and the Crown. The largest party forms the executive government, whose primary role is to run government and present laws, and overall represents the will of the majority. The House of Commons is elected to reflect

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    British Politics: Thatcherism and Reaganomics

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    The polarization of the British political system can be traced back to the movement of Thatcherism. Thatcherism can be seen as the conviction politics, economic, social policy, and is the political movement that can even resemble Reaganomics. Just like Reaganomics, Thatcherism is considered a conservative movement that emphasizes heavily on the free markets, restraining government spending, privatization, deregulation, and tax cuts. These are the policies that Margaret Thatcher focused on; this political

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    Thatcher is considered to be one of the most controversial figures in modern British politics and remains the only 20th century Prime Minister to give her name to an ideology. There has never been a clear consensus on the meaning of Thatcherism and it has been used to describe a vast array of ideas. Nigel Lawson, who claims to have invented the term, describes it as ‘a mixture of free markets, financial discipline, firm control over public expenditure, tax cuts, nationalism, ‘Victorian values’…

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    Conservative Dominance in British Politics There are many different factors which contributed to the Conservative dominance of the period between 1885 and 1905. For one, the electoral reform of Gladstone's second ministry had a large effect on the Conservatives period in office as did the skill of Salisbury as a leader. The role that the government took in terms of its policies and foreign policy, and the nature of support for the party also played important roles in the conservative dominance

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    members or the people they represent. There are several types of pressure groups including insider and outsider groups. Insider groups are regularly consulted by the government and provide them with important information which can influence policy, eg. British Medical Association on health issues. On the other hand, outsider groups have yet to establish a consultative relationship with the government normally because they behave irresponsibly so the government will not engage with them, eg. Father4Justice

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    16th October 1834, London: UK. The banks of the river Thames are lined amass with crowds gloating, cheering and relishing the astonishing view that prevails before their eyes. One of the most significant events in the history of British political architecture and my opening statement portrays a celebration. However, It was on this evening that the Palace of Westminster was victim to a great fire, causing the huge gathering to look on and revel in the physical downfall of the political establishment

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    The Era of Privatisation

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    The Era of Privatisation Introduction It was under the Thatcher government that the era of privatisation started and it was “the most radical change in the 20th century British politics” (Young, 2001, p. 1). From 1984 to 1991, the telecommunications, gas, water and electricity industries which were under government control, were sold to become privately owned and controlled. The privatisation of the electricity industry occurred in 1990 but had already begun in 1987 with the creation of a programme

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    change governmental intervention had in their lives, one must consider a number of different aspects. The scene must firstly be set by ascertaining the mood of the people upon the outbreak of war, and this Bourne eloquently describes: "The British urban working class was the oldest industrial workforce in the world. Its class-consciousness was very strong. It was well organised. It had a sharp awareness of its industrial strength. It was quite remarkably strike-prone. It was also riven with

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    be able to take his seat and can also be fined. Same happens with judges and other public servants in the United Kingdom, who are, even if symbolically, servants of the Crown. This, however, is just a small visible end of the real power that the British –constitutional- monarchy holds over public employees. Since the limitation of powers of the Crown in the XVII century the royals have been using their forceful influence in an unofficial way for their own benefit (Adams, 2010; Booth 2010 and 2011;

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    Conservative Dominance in British Politics Between 1885 and 1902 During this period in history, it is clear to say that the conservatives dominated British politics. However, is it due to conservative strengths or liberal weaknesses? Although the weakness and the divisions within the liberal party helped the conservative cause, the latter party were dominant due to their unrivalled strength in politics. There were many reasons for these strengths, but it is safe to say that this was the

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    ethnicity . This essay has similar interest. The main goal of this essay is to bring closer the issues of ethnicity and the politics of identity in British sport. In this essay, I am going to introduce the history of immigrants to Britain and Development of Sport in Britain in order to bring closer the high influence of different cultures on British culture, and of course on British sport. I will also discuss some issues related to race and ethnicity that are present in sport. History of Immigrants to

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    Contribution of both Gladstone and Disraeli to British Politics Between 1846 and 1865 The debate over the Corn Laws in 1846 brought Gladstone and Disraeli much closer to the forefront of British Politics. Gladstone was part of the Tory party led by his mentor Peel who supported the abolition of the Corn Laws and in essence supported Free Trade. The Tory party were divided on whether to support Free Trade; Disraeli was a leading player in the section of the Tory party, which wanted to keep

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    William B. Willcox's The Age of Aristocracy

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    and its inclusion in this series reveals much about its scope and intent. Smith writes in the Preface to the series that "their authors have tried by artistry to step beyond the usual confines of a textbook and conjure up something of the drama of politics, of the wealth of personalities, and even of the pettiness, as well as the greatness, of human motivation." Some of this can be found in The Age of Aristocracy; some of it cannot. William B. Willcox's device for covering the significant people and

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    role in the process of policy making. Also, the UK’s membership in the EU, the incorporation of the European Convention on Human Rights into British law and the devolution of powers to elected assemblies all over the UK are three main factors that have been instrumental in the rise of judicial activism with the courts being of more significance in politics. As well as the Constitutional Reform Act of 2005 in particular which brought about several changes to judicial branch of government Judges themselves

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    Assessment of the View that Liberalism has Triumphed as the Dominant Ideology in Contemporary British Politics When establishing whether liberalism is the dominant ideology in contemporary British politics, we must first establish the meaning of the key terms; liberalism, ideology and contemporary. The Oxford English Dictionary defines contemporary as, "living or occurring in the same or present modern period". This basically means present day. When defining ideology we must understand that

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    Influence of Colonization Politics on Modern Field-work… Hell-bent on expansion, the British Empire insisted on the exhaustive domination of one people over another, and in doing so, fostered hatred and friction between cultures in the late nineteenth/early twentieth centuries. Cultural friction has presented a large disruption in the anthropological relationship between observer and participant in historical fieldwork, and moreover, “the bulk of social and cultural anthropological field work

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    that the personal qualities of politicians can help citizens distinguish candidates when the there is little difference be... ... middle of paper ... ...and Public Policy - Discussion Paper D-2. McAllister, I., (2005), ‘The Personalisation of Politics’ - http://politicsir.cass.anu.edu.au/staff/mcallister/pubs/personal.pdf [Accessed online on - 31th March 2014]. Savigny, H., (2004), ‘The Media and the Personal Lives of Politicians in the United States’, Parliamentary Affairs, 57(1):223-235. Seaton

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    Topic: What were the legacies of French and British colonialism in Sub-Saharan Africa? How similar/different were those legacies? Paul Nugent. (2004). Africa Since Independence. Palgrave Macmillan This is a comparative study of the different trajectories and experiences of independent African states. It addresses the differential legacies of British, French, Portuguese, Belgian and Spanish colonialism as well as the unique qualities of imperial Ethiopia and Liberia Richard Hughes (2003). Capricorn:

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    Scholars from Aristotle onward have proposed that the characteristics of society directly affect the nature of government. If we apply this to Britain and France, we shall see that this proposal is definitely true. The difference between the British and French cultures becomes obvious when an assessment looks at their political systems, and each of the 6 structures, and the full range of the political culture's influence on each structure is understood. Political socialization is the learning

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