Essay on Post-colonial Criticism of Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre

Essay on Post-colonial Criticism of Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre

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A broad focus on Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre reveals multiple perspectives in which postcolonial criticism could be angled. For the most part, this study will explore the representation of a selection of foreign cultures as a foil to Europe’s presumed magnificence. Additionally, focus will be trained on the gender relations as an indicator of patriarchal colonialism. On this second point, the study will attempt to illustrate the various ways in which the character of Jane Eyre is deliberately constructed to counter the male colonialist ego. Some more illustrations will be sought regarding the relationship of classes as another appendage of postcolonial relations. The thesis undergirding this discussion is that the struggle between cultures, gender and classes is the three-pronged assessment that illustrates the postcolonial discourse in Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre.
The construction of Jane Eyre as a seemingly flawless and strong character serves two purposes in the text. The primary purpose is to display the Victorian struggle for women against patriarchal dominance. The patriarchal systems of dominance and control within the Victorian society were the sole machinery that advanced the colonial interests of the male gender against the female gender. In Jane Eyre, the female gender is portrayed as particularly weak and lacking in the necessary strengths that are required to pursue their interests. Jane Eyre becomes a rebel within the system by articulating open and consistent defiance against the status quo. Her travails, challenges, successes and final triumph signify the determined shift by the author in portraying women as different beings other than the weak and fragile characters that were consistent with the Victorian meta-...


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... self worth against the material dominance in the society. Characters such as Mr. Rochester and Sarah Reed are what they are because they represent the wealthy class in the society. The postcolonial discourse in Jane Eyre is mainly anchored on the active portrayal of the British culture as essentially superior to the Eastern cultures and the French culture. To bring out the salient features of this discourse, the author has used themes and characterization efficiently.









Works Cited

Bronte, Ch. &Greene, J. (2010). Jane Eyre. London: Saddleback Educational Publ..
Lewis, R. &Mills, S. (2003). Feminist Postcolonial Theory: A Reader. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
Moran, M. (2006). Victorian Literature and Culture. New York: Continuum International Publishing Group.
O’Reilly, Ch. (2004). Post-Colonial Literature. London: Cambridge: Klett.

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