Jane Eyre Essays

  • Jane Eyre

    608 Words  | 2 Pages

    novel Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte uses Jane Eyre as her base to find out how a character confronts the demands of a private passion that conflicts with her responsibilities. . Mistreated abused and deprived of a normal childhood, Jane Eyre creates an enemy early in her childhood with her Aunt Mrs. Reed. Just as Mrs. Reeds life is coming to an end, she writes to Jane asking her for forgiveness, and one last visit from her. “Will you have the goodness to send me the address of my niece, Jane Eyre, and

  • Jane Eyre

    1313 Words  | 3 Pages

    “I am no bird; and no net ensnares me; I am a free human being with an independent will.” (Bronte, Jane Eyre). This quote expresses Charlotte’s beliefs on women’s equalities. Charlotte Bronte was born in 1816. She was one of six children and lived in Yorkshire County England. She first worked as a governess in the Sidewick family then in the White family for only nine months. Charlotte wanted more for herself, and none of her jobs satisfied her ambitions. When she moved back home, she discovered

  • Jane Eyre

    1310 Words  | 3 Pages

    Jane Eyre The way in which society tries to live today goes hand in hand with the quote "What really matters is on the inside, not the outside", which is often repeated, maybe because people want everyone to feel equal and no one inferior or maybe because a person just wants to feel better about his or herself so this statement is said. The story "Jane Eyre" completely contradicts this quote, especially during the social extravaganza, which was put on by Mr. Rochester and the Thornfield workers

  • Jane Eyre

    574 Words  | 2 Pages

    Jane Eyre When Jane Eyre is introduced to Reverend St. John Rivers, she has already had a lifetime of experiences, but she still does not have a good sense of self. By the time that Jane leaves St. John, she is a newly self-assured woman who knows what she wants in life, and is determined to achieve her goals. When St. John is first introduced in the book, he finds Jane completely destitute with nowhere to go and no one to rely on for help. Despite her refusal to reveal her true identity,

  • Jane Eyre

    915 Words  | 2 Pages

    Brontë’s Jane Eyre fixates on the coming of age of a poor orphan girl developing into an independent woman in Victorian England. In “Gazes, Fires, and Brain-Body Repair in Brontë’s Jane Eyre” Nina Pelikan Straus examines Jane Eyre through a lens of psychoanalytic criticism. This lens involves examining the effects of life circumstances on a character and how these contribute to individuals under similar circumstances. Straus effectively analyzes the psychological development in Jane Eyre through her

  • Jane Eyre

    671 Words  | 2 Pages

    Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte reflects the contentions Jane faces as a child and while growing up. Bronte gives a distinct explanation of the struggles Jane has to face while living with the Reeds family. Bronte describes her life story under the name of Jane Eyre. Bronte faces many challenges while growing up, resembling Jane's life in the narrative. Jane Eyre is an autobiography of Charlotte Bronte's life, which proclaims many challenges and contentions that the author and the character face. The

  • Jane Eyre

    2388 Words  | 5 Pages

    Jane Eyre Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre can be linked to many fairy-tales. Some of these tales such as Charle’s Perrault’s Bluebeard, Arabian Nights, and many more are actually cited in the text. Others are alluded to through the events that take place in the story. Jane Eyre has often been viewed as a Cinderellatale for example. There is also another story, however, that though not mentioned directly, can definitely be linked to Bronte’s novel. This tale is none other than Beauty and the Beast

  • Jane Eyre

    1184 Words  | 3 Pages

    Jane Eyre Jane and Rochester Belong Together The overriding theme of Jane Eyre is Jane's continual quest for love. Jane searches for love and acceptance throughout the book. The intelligent, honest, plain-featured girl is forced to contend with oppression, inequality, and hardship. Jane's meets with a series of individuals who threaten her autonomy, but she maintains her principles of justice, human dignity, and morality, as well as her values of intellectual and emotional fulfillment. As a

  • Jane Eyre

    1106 Words  | 3 Pages

    decision.”1 Such powerful words were found in the famous romance novels of Charlotte Bronte. Through her novels Jane Eyre and The Professor Bronte’s life experiences were reflected by her main characters as they sought independence, conceived images as symbols of important events in their lives, and they exhibited commitment to their goals. Like Charlotte Bronte both William Crimsworth and Jane Eyre encountered hardships early in their lives therefore they sought independence. Crimsworth’s need to leave

  • Jane Eyre

    2408 Words  | 5 Pages

    educated, generous, blissful woman? Well, in Jane Eyre, the main character overcomes all obstacles thrown at her and makes a great life for herself. From a miserable, orphaned young girl to a happily married, well educated woman, Jane Eyre transforms immensely throughout the novel. Through her many experiences in essential locations, she grows significantly at Gateshead, Lowood School, Thornfield, Marsh End, and Ferndean. The novel begins at Gateshead where Jane is a young, ten year old, orphaned child

  • Jane Eyre

    794 Words  | 2 Pages

    Jane Eyre Theme Essay (rough draft) Independence, the capacity to manage ones own affairs, make one’s own judgments, and provide for one’s self. Jane Eyre herself is a very independent woman. Throughout her life she has depended on very few people for very little. Charlotte Brontë wants the reader to learn that independence can open many doors of possibilities. Jane in her younger years was practically shunned by everyone and was shown very little love and compassion, from this throughout her life

  • Jane Eyre

    780 Words  | 2 Pages

    truth about society. In the novel Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Bronte, the reader follows the struggle of a young girl known as Jane. Her life begins in a rich society with her aunt Mrs. Reed and three children. After, her parents died her uncle Mr. Reed took her into live with them. Mr. Reed, before he died, made his wife promise to keep Jane after he died. Mrs. Reed treated Jane very poorly and sent her to a boarding school for orphan. After becoming a teacher, Jane leaves the orphan school and works

  • Jane Eyre

    1656 Words  | 4 Pages

    Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte 2.     End of Chapter Ten My favorite character at this time in the novel, is Jane Eyre. A new chapter in her life was about to begin when she was accepted for the position as a governess, for a small child at Thornfield Hall. She has come a long way from her days abandoned by her cruel aunt and treated poorly by her cousins. After her school days at Lowood, she wanted a brighter and more independent life for herself. She has had the strength to be strong and confident

  • Jane Eyre

    1243 Words  | 3 Pages

    the aunt Jane was left with when her parents died. Mrs. Reed is very mean and cruel to Jane, she sides with her children more than she does Jane. After throwing Jane into the red-room Jane says Mrs. Reed “knew not what you did” and she thought she was “only uprooting my bad propensities” (17). Mr. Brocklehurst is an administrator at the Lowood School Jane attends. Mr. Brocklehurst is a hypocrite. He blames the students for actions he actually was guilty of. Mr. Brocklehurst treated Jane mean and

  • Jane Eyre

    1651 Words  | 4 Pages

    Jane Eyre is the main character in the novel Jane Eyre, written by Charlotte Bronte. She is a fictional character along with the book. The book takes place in the mid 1800’s. Jane lives in five different places which greatly affect her life. The first place Jane stays is Gateshead Hall. She then goes to live at Lowood School. From Lowood Jane proceeds on to Thornfield Hall. She then advances on to Moor House. Finally, Jane reaches her final home at Ferndean. All of this happens within two decades

  • Jane Eyre

    1462 Words  | 3 Pages

    In Charlotte Bronte’s, Jane Eyre, Jane goes through numerous self-discoveries, herself-realization and discipline leads her to a life she chooses to make her happy. Jane Eyre has a rough life from the start. Forced to stay with people who despise her, Jane can only help herself. Jane must overcome the odds against her, which add to many. Jane is a woman with no voice, until she changes her destiny. The novel Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Bronte consists of continuous journeys through Jane’s life towards

  • Jane Eyre

    2710 Words  | 6 Pages

    Jane Eyre St. John Rivers makes some very intriguing choices in Jane Eyre. He is constantly faced with difficult decisions to make. Whether it be refusing his true love or moving to India to give his life serving others, there is always an interesting twist where St. John is concerned. His importance in the novel may be evident to readers, but they may not always understand his decisions and his actions. The choices he makes are exemplary of a man who has given his life to serve God and His

  • Jane Eyre

    2547 Words  | 6 Pages

    In the two stories, Jane Eyre and The Yellow Wallpaper, the main characters are faced with various encounters with authority. Jane and the Narrator are the central characters that are faced with these authority figures, and an external as well as an internal relationship is developed with the figures that have power over them. These two women also display a unique use of authority to benefit themselves at various points in the stories. Jane and the Narrator are first alike in the way that they outwardly

  • Jane Eyre

    3143 Words  | 7 Pages

    Jane Eyre and the Lovemad Woman I was experiencing an ordeal: a hand of fiery iron grasped my vitals. Terrible moment: full of struggle blackness, burning! No human being that ever lived could wish to be loved better then I was loved; and him who thus loved me I absolutely worshipped: and I must renounce love and idol. (311; ch. 27) Jane Eyre’s inner struggle over leaving an already married Rochester is the epitome of the new "lovemad" woman in nineteenth-century literature. Jane Eyre is

  • Jane Eyre

    704 Words  | 2 Pages

    Jane Eyre Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre, is the story of Jane, an orphan girl with a harsh upbringing. During a time when women were condemned for learning more than custom pronounced necessary, Jane becomes educated intellectually, socially, and spiritually. In the course of growing up she travels to many places as she battles to learn more about herself and about the world. In the following paragraphs you’ll see how Bronte establishes that money and power do not make a person. Mrs. Reed,