Police And Criminal Evidence Act 1984 Essay examples

Police And Criminal Evidence Act 1984 Essay examples

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Police, in this case in England and Wales, is very important in our everyday life and it is an interest to all the society. Policing is usually seen as a great good due to fighting crime and keep the streets safe. But it can also be seen in a less positive way regarding riots and demonstrations, as well as improper behaviour, for instance violence, fitting up suspects or planting evidence.
Even being an authority, police officers have to act according determined rules and follow certain prototypes when dealing with people. They have to go along with The Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 (PACE) and respect its rules.
PACE aims to reach the right balance between the powers of the police and the rights and freedoms of the public. The PACE standards of practice cover: stop and search, arrest, detention, investigation, identification and interviewing detainees.
So when a person is arrested is taken to a police station and held in custody, being questioned after, and while in custody people have their rights.
The police can hold a person up to 24 hours before they have to charge them with a crime or release them. Also, the police can request to hold someone for up to 36 or 96 hours if suspected of a serious crime. Finally, in Terrorism cases (declared by the Terrorism Act) the police can hold someone without charge for up to 14 days.
If the person being arrested is under 18 years old or a vulnerable adult, the process is different. In these cases, the individual is hold until an adult (parents, guardians, social workers and friend or family member aged over 18) attend to pick the person up.
The police have rights to stop any person at any time, in order do search them. To do so, the police officer needs to have a 'reasonable ...


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...ios of society looking at a police officer carrying their firearms: some people would feel safe seeing that the police is protected and would be able to protect any citizen if need; some other people would feel afraid, wondering if everything was normal and questioning the need of police officers carrying guns with them. An considered alternative is the use of teasers because they are not that showy and the shock doses can be moderated in a way that would not kill a person.
People will always have disagrements regarding police powers and laws, some people trust and believe in some points while others believe and support others and probably we will not be able to get to a general accordance. Laws change because time changes and police needs to adapt. But a common matter of interest to everybody, society and the police, is the safety and well being of every individual.

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Police And Criminal Evidence Act 1984 Essay examples

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