Essay about Oneida Indian Nation

Essay about Oneida Indian Nation

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The Iroquois Indians eventually got much of their land back. Throughout American history Native Americans were discriminated against by Whites. They were forced to live on reservations, basically stripped of their freedom. They were forced to send their children to residential school systems. They could not vote. They could not marry Whites (Berger). They were victims of hate crime. Their reservations were dumping grounds, the Navajo reservation was a series of 1,100 abandoned uranium mines and nuclear test sites, seemingly exempt from the environmental protection that exists off the reservation (Schaefer,170). Considering how committed to the land the Native Americans were, this injustice must have been especially bitter. Other manifestations seen among White- Black racism include segregation and slavery, neither of which is seen among the Indians. Instead, Americans tried repeated formal attempts to assimilate the Native Americans including the Allotment Act, Indian Reorganization Act, Employment Assistance Program, Termination Act, missionaries and the BIA reservation schools (Schaefer,171). Racism was evident in the policies enacted forcing Native American children to attend residential schools. American’s theorized they could separate them from their parents and “kill the Indian… to save the man” (Johansen). The schools would also play a role in the loss of the Native American language (Johansen).

In contrast to the racial segregation experienced by Blacks, Native Americans were forced to integrate and assimilate while letting go of every tradition from spiritual beliefs and language to health and self-governance (Johansen). In the early 19th Century federal Indian agents were assigned to reservations to...


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... American Indian stereotypes. Web. .
8. Ripples of Renewal. (2004). National Geographic, 206(TheOneida.com), 88-89.
9. Schaefer, Richard T. Racial and Ethnic Groups. 13. Boston: Pearson, 2012. Print.
10. Vargas, Theresa & Shin, Annys, The Washington Post, 11/16/2013. Oneida Indian Nation is the tiny tribe taking on the NFL and Dan Snyder over Redskins name. Web. .
11. "Wikipedia the free encyclopedia." Matrilineality. 2014. Web. 2014. . Wikipedia. Arthur Raymond Halbritter. Web. < http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Raymond_Halbritter>.

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Essay about Oneida Indian Nation

- The Iroquois Indians eventually got much of their land back. Throughout American history Native Americans were discriminated against by Whites. They were forced to live on reservations, basically stripped of their freedom. They were forced to send their children to residential school systems. They could not vote. They could not marry Whites (Berger). They were victims of hate crime. Their reservations were dumping grounds, the Navajo reservation was a series of 1,100 abandoned uranium mines and nuclear test sites, seemingly exempt from the environmental protection that exists off the reservation (Schaefer,170)....   [tags: discrimination, native americans]

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