The Pros And Cons Of High School To College

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The average high school student is not ready for college. Entering college as a freshman is a lot different from entering high school as a freshman. High schools tend to “think” they are preparing you for college when really students are physically and mentally not prepared. Student’s grades are inflated in high school, which is not always good. In order to succeed in college, some attribute you should have are study skills, time management, awareness of one’s performance, persistence, and the ability to utilize study groups. The transition from high school to college tends to be a shock. Being that students are on their own, they must understand how to apply to college,…show more content…
In college, “students are expected to be young adults not large children.” After abiding by the same rules for 13 years, they tend to change. Once in college, there is a chance you will not know your professor and he will not even know your name. This time will definitely be the hardest for students because they are going from living in a house with their parents telling them, when to get up and go to school, when to go to bed, to having to wake up on your own. Students are tricked into thinking college classes will be the same as the classes they took in high school based on the name of the class, when really they need to focus on the credentials of the class as well the rigor of the teacher’s teachings. . “They expect students to make inferences, interpret results, analyze conflicting explanations of phenomena, support arguments with evidence, solve complex problems that have no obvious answer, reach conclusions, offer explanations, conduct research, engage in the give-and-take of ideas, and generally think deeply about what they are being taught” (National Research Council, 2002). College curriculum is extremely different from high school. The tasks you expected to have completed in a week in high school, you are given a max of one day to have the assignment complete. It could range from reading a certain amount of books in one day, too writing “well-reasoned, well organized, and well documented with evidence…show more content…
What this widely held definition assumes or presumes is that the number of courses that high school students take, and the units and names assigned to them, are accurate, comprehensive proxies for college-level success (Callan, Finney, Kirst, Usdan, & Venezia, 2006). In high school, students may take Advanced Placement classes, as well as Honors classes, yet they still don’t match the curriculum of a college classroom. High school take classes that make their transcripts look presentable so that one is able to get into a good college. “A key necessary component that could address issues of course quality would be a set of criteria that specify the performances necessary to receive a high school diploma. Since the 1980s, states have centered their reform efforts on the development of statewide standards and assessments. Yet most of these standards setting activities end at the 10th grade” that leaves college students with two years of learning materials not needed for college. The mean grade point average has increased over the year. Researchers have noticed a lot of grade inflation since their time. What is now considered to be a “B” was then a “C”. With the inflation of grades, requirements for schools have
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