The Failure Of The Treaty Of Versailles Essay

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World War I was the most destructive and deadly war for its time the world has ever experienced. There was a great amount of effort put into insuring that it would not happen again. At the Paris Peace Conference the ground work was laid for a new safer, and more organized Europe. In doing so it was necessary to instruct new laws, and to reestablish boundaries of countries. This meant that the losers of the war, mostly Germany, would have to suffer the most. The resulting laws agreed on by all the attending countries were known as The Treaty of Versailles. The treaty of Versailles failed to ensure permanent global peace because Germany resented the terms of the treaty. Feeling as if the treaty were unfair, Germany became increasingly set on…show more content…
For these reasons many of the rules of The Treaty of Versailles were created to prevent a World War II. However, In addition to having to lose all of Germanys oversea colonies, they also were also forced to give up part of their homeland known as the Rhineland (cite 157). The area was sandwiched between France and Germany, and now became a 30 mile permanent demilitarization zone (book 157). Allied forces also occupied the Rhineland area west of the Rhine River and even controlled the rivers bridgeheads (book 157). These actions angered Germany even further, as now they had to give up a vital area of their country full of resources. The treaty also made sure measures were taken to force Germany into strict limitations on its armed forces and weapons (book 157). While these rules help give France piece of mind, it angered Germany and set them hell bent on…show more content…
Many white collar workers of Germany were fearful the blue collar parties of the left would destroy their government as they knew it (book 161). For this reason, many German’s turned to Hitler for political Stability (cite 161). After being put down so many times by the rest of the world, Hitler offered a refreshing pro German view citizens were looking for. In fact, it was Hitler’s plan that the Treaty of Versailles count be contested by taking up arms (book 163). To many Germans this seemed like a great idea, as they were still loathing from the strict punishment from the
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