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Should Autisitc Children Be Mainstreamed

explanatory Essay
1343 words
1343 words
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The Argumentative Essay

The issue of whether or not children with autistic disorders should be main-streamed, or placed in the same classrooms as non-autistic children, has been a very real concern for quite some time. While the debate is continuous, people often choose to side on a particular position of the argument without correctly evaluating all of the options. Should autistic children be main-streamed in regular classrooms, or should they be placed in self contained environments? Or, possibly, should a common ground be determined?

Autistic children have been analyzed for correct mainstreaming involves a gradual and supported procedure with encouragement and supervision years, and with the proper supervision and education aids, have been found to succeed in regular education classes. Because of the opportunity to develop social interaction skills, as well as the need to stay on the right educational pace, mainstreaming autistic children into regular learning environments with the use of special aids is the best option.

Done correctly, mainstreaming does not mean simply placing the child into a classroom of regular students and expecting him to succeed on his own. Instead, it takes extra help to integrate autistic children into a mainstreamed environment because the others in the classroom are more socially motivated, whereas the child is more instinctively and structurally motivated (Siegel 226). With the help and constant support of special aids within the classroom, a child with autistic disorders has a better chance of succeeding because they are around children who will encourage proper behavior and social skills.

Development of social skills is very important for children that are diagnosed with autism because of ...

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...is case, full inclusion means that all students, regardless of handicapping condition or severity, will be in a regular classroom full time. Although some may argue that that it is important to give every student equal opportunities to learn, and that it is only fair to include all students in regular learning environments, Decisions about including children with autism into fully integrated settings must be made consistent with the principle of the "least restrictive environment" as a guiding principle. No person with autism should be unnecessarily or inappropriately denied access to meaningful educational activities. However, it should be noted that the concept of least restrictive environment requires that appropriate learning take place. Placement decisions also require that students be capable of meaningful learning and functioning within the setting selected.

In this essay, the author

  • Analyzes the debate over whether autistic children should be main-streamed in regular classrooms or placed in self-contained environments.
  • Explains that mainstreaming autistic children into regular learning environments with the use of special aids is the best option.
  • Explains that mainstreaming requires extra help to integrate autistic children into a mainstreamed environment because the others in the classroom are socially motivated, whereas the child is more instinctively and structurally motivated.
  • Explains that social mainstreaming helps autistic children learn through imitation, or learning how to "copy" the behavior of others.
  • Explains that autistic children are integrated into regular education classes with the use of shadow aids, or "special helpers." they are placed directly with one or two students to work as encouragement partners.
  • Explains that academic mainstreaming helps to ensure that the child learns at the rate that best stimulates his cognitive potential. the school environment is a significant support and positive influence on the lives of autistic children.
  • Explains that mainstreaming and inclusion are two different approaches to serving students with disabilities.
  • Explains mainstreaming was first used in the late 1970s and early 1980s after the individuals with disabilities education act (idea) was passed into law.
  • Explains that appropriate education means that each child’s program is individually tailored to provide remediation for that child's disabilities: goals and objectives are formulated annually by teachers and assessment experts.
  • Explains that while pl 94-142 does guarantee each autistic child an appropriate education, it doesn't obligate the school to provide the best possible education for that child.
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