President Andrew Jackson: The Controversial President Of Andrew Jackson

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Andrew Jackson was the seventh President of the United States, an American Soldier and General, and a statesman who served in both houses of Congress. Jackson served eight years as the President and was known as a “man of the people.” Sounds like a great presidency, right? Not necessarily; Jackson would go on to become a bit of a controversial President. Andrew Jackson has good and bad written to his name. From making Native Americans walk to their new homes to preventing a civil war to creating a new political party, Jackson has a lot under his name and people’s opinion on the seventh President still go back and forth to this day. In 1828, the election for the president of the United States was down to two candidates. The sixth President of the United States John Quincy Adams, and the American soldier and statesman Andrew Jackson. John Quincy Adams was running under the Federalists Party, while Andrew Jackson was running under the newly established Democratic Party. The Democratic Party was formed in 1792, but the name was adopted by Andrew Jackson when he ran in 1828 (Wormser). Andrew Jackson went on to win with his newly formed Democratic Party and would be called and be known by many things. King Andrew would become a nickname of the seventh President of the United States because of some of his…show more content…
The Trail of Tears, closing the National Banks, and the way he governed were all bad things towards him. However, in the end, Jackson is on the twenty-dollar bill and he was the seventh President of the United States. This means he is a part of the history that makes up the United States of America and he should be remembered for the good things he did regardless of what he has done. This means he should be remembered for creating a successful political party, his likeliness and resemblance to the common man, and for how he kept together the country when the north and south had very opposing

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