The Legacy Of Andrew Jackson

1363 Words6 Pages
Andrew Jackson is one of the most controversial presidents. Many regard him as a war hero, the father of the Democratic Party, an inspiring leader, and a spokesman for the common man. While there is plenty to praise about the seventh president, his legacy is tarnished by his racism, disregard for the law of the land, cruelty towards the Native Americans, and ruthless temper. Jackson was an intriguing man who was multi-faceted. One must not look at a singular dimension, and cast judgment on him as a whole. To accurately evaluate one of the most complex presidents, it is crucial to observe Jackson from all possible angles. Prior lifestyle, hardships in life, political ideology, lifestyle of the time, political developments, and his character…show more content…
Andrew Jackson, Southerner, by Mark Cheathem, is an in-depth book on President Jackson’s life and ideologies. Cheatham is a professor at Cumberland University, which is located thirty minutes away from the Hermitage, Jackson’s mansion. His knowledge of the period, lifestyle, and specifically Andrew Jackson’s life while at the Hermitage is astounding. The bulk of his works and article dove into the Jacksonian period and America’s early republic. From the rise of the Democrats to the life of Andrew Jackson’s nephew, Cheathem is a historian who studies ninteenth century history. However, bias was present in the book, since he depicted the South in a positive light. Perhaps, it is because he is from the South. At any rate, slight bias is present within the book, and should be noted when taking into account Jackson’s background, and its effect on Jackson’s…show more content…
Inskeep said books who characterize Jackson’s side, depict the reasons why Jackson removed the Indians. While other books list the Indian population as major characters within their book, they claimed Jackson was stubborn, disregarded the law, was a murderer, and was nothing short of a racist. Inskeep took a neutral and unique approach when discussing the topic. The narrative is that of an observer, looking overhead as if in a display. This is the point of view Inskeep tried to capture in his book. Andrew Jackson and John Ross are the two key characters he showcased on a Democratic stage, in an attempt to understand both men’s motives and
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