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Loss Of Innocence In Lord Of The Flies Essay

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In Lord of the Flies, the author, William Golding, uses literary elements to convey this idea that people lose their innocence due to no supervision or no one telling a person what is right and what is wrong. On the island, there were no laws or rules for the boys to follow. When they first got to the island they were innocent. They just wanted to have fun. But as things got out of control, they lose their innocence. Some examples of loss of innocence are characters Roger, Jack, and the littluns. The littluns were the youngest boys on the island. Their ages are unknown, giving them the name Littluns. They play and build sandcastles, making them innocent at first. In chapter 4, the author points out that, “Apart from food and sleep, they found time for play, aimless and trivial...they seldom bothered with the biguns and their passionately emotional and corporate life was their own” (Golding 59). William Golding uses killer…show more content…
He was never innocent in the novel. He did things for no reason such as destroying the littluns’ sandcastles and throwing rocks at Henry. In chapter 4 of the novel, the author explains, “Roger led the way straight through the castles, kicking them over, burying the flowers, scattering the chosen stones” (Golding 60). The author uses characterization to suggest that Roger never had any innocence. In chapter 11, the author stated that, “Roger...leaned all his weight on the lever...the rock struck Piggy…Piggy fell forty feet and landed on his back…” (Golding 180). Roger saw Piggy as a “bag of fat” and thought it best to get rid of him. Golding uses irony to suggest that Roger never considered Piggy as one of them. Roger was one of the main characters who never had innocence. The author used Roger to convey the idea that everyone may have not been born innocent. Throughout the novel, Jack never liked Piggy. He constantley teases Piggy and tells him to shut up. He would hurt him and steal Piggy’s glasses without
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