History Of The Uganda Railway

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What were the main reasons for the Asian community not returning to India after the completion of constructing the Uganda Railway? Plan Of Investigation The essay “What were the main reasons for the Asian community not returning to India after the completion of constructing the Uganda Railway?” Analyzes the main reasons for the Asian community not returning to India after the completion of constructing the Uganda Railway. After this analysis we will come to know why some Asians did not go back to their homeland but chose to stay in Uganda after building the railway. It will also help us know how they have lived and what has been their impact on Uganda. The railway started being constructed in 1896 and was completed by 1901. It stretched from Mombasa crossing Kisumu on the Eastern shore of Lake Victoria then from there it reached port bell and finally Kampala. For this essay research from different historical books were used as the main source and oral interviews from witnesses who were assumed to have knowledge about the Asian history in East Africa but particularly in Uganda. Summary Of Evidence. The idea to construct the railway was started by the Imperial British East African Company under Captain J.R.L MacDonald and Engineer Sir George White house. The purpose of the construction of the railway was to link Uganda to the coast in order to mainly; Ease the transportation of colonial administrators and troops through the British colonies and to protect the British colonial interests in Egypt, Uganda and Kenya. When the construction was completed, out of the 31,983 Indian workers who had come to east Africa to work on the railway, 2,493 died while 6,454 were invalided back home, notes J.S Mangat in ‘A History of the Asians in ... ... middle of paper ... ... ‘settled strangers’. They now belong to a jet set of business class who have lived in East Africa for three generations or more, belonging to the “higher middle class up to the national elite”. And while the different branches of a family may now be locally embedded wherever they are, their primary loyalty is to the family and the company. Indians such as Kalidas Mehta and the Madhvani family are well known Asians who have contributed immensely to the economy. For example one company alone, the Madhvani Group, accounted for 12% of Uganda’s national output, and many others have excelled. The number of the Ugandan Asians on the rich list is sizeable; Sudhir Ruperelia for example is the wealthiest Asian industrialist in Uganda today. Their settlement should then be considered a positive rather than a negative impact on East Africa and Uganda in particular.

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