Effect of WWII on Women

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A Plan of the Investigation The aim of this investigation is to research the question, “How did the involvement of women in World War II on the home front affect the role and position of women in society?” The scope of the investigation has one main focus: women who remained in the United States and how they pushed the role of women in society forward. Within this topic, it is broken down into women who joined the labor force and women who remained in the household. B Summary of Evidence There were varying levels of involvement of women during World War II, but this investigation will be looking at women who remained in the United States of America. There are two subsections: women who joined the previously male-dominated business realm, and women who continued to work in the domestic sphere. At the beginning of WWII, it was evident that to win the war, weapons and aircraft would have to be produced; but because most men were overseas, women had to manufacture those goods (Weatherford 154). It was recorded later that of 1950s female workers, 22% entered the work force during the war (Goldin 8). Some manufacturers modified their factories to make them better for female workers, but most did not approve of women in the workplace. To discourage them, women were paid less for doing the same job as men (Weatherford 173). The average skilled female worker in 1944 made $23.44 less than the average man per week, earning just $31.21 (Hartmann). Fortunately, many women were not working for the pay, they were working for the war effort (Weatherford 180). Women wanted to decide whether or not they could start a career, so they came in droves to work (Weatherford 170). At most, there were 19,170,000 female workers (Hartma... ... middle of paper ... ...II. Champaign: University of Illinois Press, 2009. Print. Library of Congress. Women Come to the Front: Journalists, Photographers, and Broadcasters During World War II. Washington D.C.: Library of Congress, 1995. Print. McEuen, Melissa A. Making War, Making Women: Femininity and Duty on the American Home Front, 1941-1945. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2011. Print. "Rosie the Riveter." Gale Encyclopedia of U.S. Economic History. Ed. Thomas Carson and Mary Bonk. Detroit: Gale, 1999. Student Resources in Context. Web. 15 Apr. 2014. Weatherford, Doris. American Women and World War II. New York: Facts on File, 1990. Print. “Welcome.” Jordynn Jack, PhD. n.p., 18 Nov. 2011. Web. 30 April 2014. "World War II." Gale Encyclopedia of U.S. Economic History. Ed. Thomas Carson and Mary Bonk. Detroit: Gale, 1999. Student Resources in Context. Web. 15 Apr. 2014.

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