Death of the Newspaper: Where Will Journalism Go From Here?

Death of the Newspaper: Where Will Journalism Go From Here?

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The U.S. newspaper industry is in a time of transition. Ad revenue profits and print readership have been steadily declining for years and things are only continuing to get worse. As readers slowly gravitate towards the internet to fulfill their news needs, more and more newspapers are being forced to close their doors. In spite of this, the spirit of journalism cannot be allowed to die. Media expert Clay Shirky (2009, para. 10) writes that, “There is no general model for newspapers to replace the one the internet just broke.” Shirky’s right, there is no general model because it’s no longer about replacing newspapers; it’s about saving journalism and giving journalists a new media in which to thrive.
In an age where young people have been steadily gravitating away from newspapers as a source for news, many would argue that the death of newspapers is not important. However, many other industries are also being indirectly impacted by the declining news industry. The hard work of print journalists is being utilized daily by not only radio and television stations but also by bloggers, politicians and social commentators. The newspaper industry has continuously benefitted society in a way that no other industry has and it has done so quietly from the background.
Typically, newspapers have far more resources than radio and television stations. For instance, the Dallas Morning News, has more reporters in the city of Dallas than ABC, NBC, CBS and Fox television affiliates combined (Kirchhoff, 2010, p. 10). A newspaper’s larger staff allows it to cover every event, big or small from every angle. Eventually, when the majority of newspapers die out, radio and television stations will have to scramble to provide news coverage with thei...


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...wined; the spirit of journalism will be allowed to thrive. Although there is currently not a concrete system in place, there rarely is during revolutions, the next big thing is only around the corner. This is not the end for journalism, it’s only the beginning.




Works Cited

Fine, J. (September 25, 2008). What will replace big-city newspapers?. Bloomberg Buisnessweek, Retrieved from http://www.buisnessweek.com/magazine/content/08_40/b4102077743556.htm
Kirchhoff, S. M. (September 9, 2010). The U.S. newspaper industry in transition. Retrieved from http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/R40700.pdf
More media, less news. (August 24, 2006). The Economist, Retrieved from http://www.economist.com/node/7827135
Shirky, C. (March 2009). Newspapers and thinking the unthinkable. Retrieved from http://www.shirky.com/weblog/2009/03/newspapers-and-thinking-the-unthinkable/

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