Essay on The Clash Between Native Americans And Euro American Settlers

Essay on The Clash Between Native Americans And Euro American Settlers

Length: 1442 words (4.1 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

The Clash between Native Americans and Euro-American Settlers
Introduction
The clash between Native Americans and Euro-American or European settlers cannot be discussed in the absence of the origin and birth of the United States. In this regard, Current, Williams & Freidel (1965), provide that the US has its origins in the quickening of Europe. In essence, as Current et al. (1965) continue to assert, after Columbus’ discovery of the new world, America presented a unique opportunity for Europeans as a land of peace, abundance, security, and liberty. For purposes of coherence, this paper will limit the phrase “Europeans” to Spaniards and Englishmen. Current et al. (1965) insinuate that in the 16th century, Spain monopolized the Americas. However, the English overtook their dominion, and, for this purpose, will represent much of the discussion with regard to the conflict. According to Sage (2010), the first permanent English settlement was established in 1607, in Jamestown, Virginia. As Canterbury (2009) explains, they came into contact with Native Americans, who consisted mainly of Indian tribes such as the Iroquois. While the two entities co-existed cordially at first, it soon became clear that they were stringently incompatible. This paper will discuss the religious factors that prompted the clash between Native Americans and early Euro-American settlers.
The Portrayal of Native Americans and Euro-American Settlers
In order to comprehend the existing religious factors that led to the conflict between European settlers and Native Americans, it is of fundamental importance to fist and foremost dissect in detail, the classification of both entities. How did the Europeans present themselves to the Native Americans? What were the def...


... middle of paper ...


...ce with certainty, that the relationship between the Native Americans and the Euro-American settlers with regard to the concept of God was incompatible. From a Christian perspective, God is one, and only exists as the trinity with regard to the Son (Jesus or the Christ), and the Holy Spirit, also referred to as the Holy Ghost. In this regard, the Christian religious perspective of the creator was rigid, and very specific. In contrast, the understanding of the creator by the Native Americans encompassed the application of several gods, each performing a specified function. Additionally, the natives also believed in the existence of spirits, and this was evident in their ceremonies. The BBC (2014) states tag one such ceremony was the Sub Dance. Because of these incompatibilities, the Euro-American settlers were prompted to develop immense prejudice towards the natives.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Essay on Substance Abuse among Native Americans

- Reflecting on the many western movies of my youth, it can be clearly recalled that the Native Americans were either scalping Euro Americans or getting sloppy drunks so they could not function physically and/or mentally. This abuse of alcohol and, in general, acceptance of drunken behavior beyond recollection of actions or knowledge of one’s environment, was widely accepted as the norm by Euro Americans outside of the Native American world and far from the arid, treeless reservations. Although tribes vacillate with regard to the use of alcohol and drugs, substance dependence is one of the principal sources of health problems facing Native Americans....   [tags: alcoholism, drug addiction]

Better Essays
2019 words (5.8 pages)

Essay on American Indian Liberation : A Theology Of Sovereignty

- In George E. Tinker’s book, American Indian Liberation: A Theology of Sovereignty, the atrocities endured by many of the first peoples, Native American tribes, come into full view. Tinker argues that the colonization of these groups had and continues to have lasting effects on their culture and thus their theology. There is a delicate balance to their culture and their spiritual selves within their tightly knit communities prior to contact from the first European explorers. In fact, their culture and spiritual aspects are so intertwined that it is conceptually impossible to separate the two, as so many Euro-American analysts attempted....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States, Race]

Better Essays
1098 words (3.1 pages)

Native Americans And Native American Religion Essay example

- The environment has proven over time that it has the power to cause change in its inhabitants. Native Americans were not an exception to this common occurrence, as they had to adapt to the changes in the environment that surrounded them. The Europeans came to the “new world” and disrupted the original culture of the land. Native Americans were compelled to assimilate their own traditions and culture to one more fitting of their new surroundings. Their religion was a component that changed drastically into a decline that left it without any of the original rituals, beliefs, and traditions....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States, Religion]

Better Essays
1899 words (5.4 pages)

The Native American And Native Americans Essay

- From as far as we know Indians themselves were the first ones to cultivate land, being given the name “Native Americans”. As a whole; the Native Americans can be traced back through the Hopi, Zuni, Iroquois, Algonquian, Natchez, and Mohawks. Indians grew up with the belief that land was a sacred gift given to them by their ancestors. Finding and learning new ways to grow crops was a valuable teaching. Passing down teachings, beliefs, and leadership roles Indians maintained to live peacefully off of what was already placed in front of them....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

Better Essays
1049 words (3 pages)

Native American And Native Americans Essay

- Throughout United States history, Americans have treated Native Americans as unequals and forced suffering on Native American tribes. Events such as the Trail of Tears, the Sand Creek Massacre, and the Navajo Long Walk, just to name a few, will forever be a dark moment in American history. At the arrival of the Europeans, the population numbers of Native Americans are estimated from five million to fifteen million, with liberals preferring the higher estimates, and conservatives preferring the lower estimates....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

Better Essays
713 words (2 pages)

The Native American Native Americans Essay

- The Native Americans For at least fifteen thousand years before the arrival of Christopher Columbus and Thomas Hariot, Native Americans had occupied the vastness of North America undisturbed by outside invaders (Shi 2015 pg. 9). Throughout the years leading up to Columbus’s voyage to the “New World” (the Americas) and Hariot’s journey across the sea, the Indians had encountered and adapted to many diverse continents; due to global warming, climatic and environmental diversity throughout the lands (2015)....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

Better Essays
1188 words (3.4 pages)

Native American And Native Americans Essay

- Over the past century, many Native American groups have experienced social and environmental change and have had to deal with a variety of contemporary issues. Although Native Americans may be associated with the past due to popular culture, many different American Indian groups are strongly affected by modern issues. For instance, while type II diabetes is a major issue in many communities, it disproportionately affects Native Americans. Beginning in the 20th century, Native American groups have been affected by diabetes, and they are currently one of the populations that are at particularly high risk for developing the disease....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

Better Essays
3303 words (9.4 pages)

Stereotypical Images Of Native Americans Essays

- For most Americans, their knowledge of Native Americans and their culture of both past and present are based predominantly on outdated labels and stereotypes. Over the past 7 weeks, we have covered several sources that have contributed to the continuous development of the stereotypical images that have unsettled the Native Americans over time. These misleading pictures, novels, Hollywood films, professional sports mascots, and other mediums have misrepresented and alienated the indigenous peoples within in each respective time period regarding the current Euro-American centered culture....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

Better Essays
1395 words (4 pages)

The Depiction Of Native Americans Essay example

- The depiction of Native Americans to the current day youth in the United States is a colorful fantasy used to cover up an unwarranted past. Native people are dressed from head to toe in feathers and paint while dancing around fires. They attempt to make good relations with European settlers but were then taken advantage of their “hippie” ways. However, this dramatized view is particularly portrayed through media and mainstream culture. It is also the one perspective every person remembers because they grew up being taught these views....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

Better Essays
771 words (2.2 pages)

Culture Clash: The Puritans and the Native Americans Essay

- In 1608, a group of Christian separatists from the Church of England fled to the Netherlands and then to the "New World" in search of the freedom to practice their fundamentalist form of Christianity (dubbed Puritanism). The group of people known as the Native Americans (or American Indians) are the aboriginal inhabitants of the Northern and Southern American continents who are believed to have migrated across the Bering land bridge from Asia around 30,000 years ago. When these two societies collided, years of enforced ideology, oppression and guerrilla warfare were begun....   [tags: American America History]

Free Essays
948 words (2.7 pages)