Analysis Of ' A Passage Of India ' Essay

Analysis Of ' A Passage Of India ' Essay

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As one of the most treasured modes of creative expression, literature possesses a remarkable power to illustrate the human condition in all of its nuanced and resplendent forms. With such power, however, comes an enormous responsibility, a duty to arouse the consciousness of the reader in a way that precipitates true emotion and contemplation. In effectuating this end, literature must transcend the literality of mere words and sentences, and instead provide the reader with a vigorous and truthful tableau of what it means to be a human being. These high standards, which all literature must fulfill, are perhaps best exemplified by E.M. Forster’s novel A Passage to India, which recounts the story of several characters trying to make sense of a “muddled” India under British rule. Incorporating a combination of an evocative setting, enduring themes, and symbolic language, Forster artfully captures in A Passage to India the timeless, thought-provoking, and dynamic essence that all works of literature must attain.
Replete with suggestive descriptions of the setting that force the reader to reflect on the text in deeper terms, A Passage to India is undeniably elevated to the ranks of exemplary literature. Forster employs the setting, particularly the dichotomy between the architecture of Europe and India, to parallel the intensification of the British-Indian racial divide in the text. For example, just after the friendship between the Englishman Mr. Fielding and the Indian Dr. Aziz collapses, Forster dedicates an entire chapter to describing the harmony of Mediterranean architecture as Fielding returns home to England. Forster emphasizes Fielding’s satisfaction as he recaptures the European “beauty of form,” but also notes that Fielding’...


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...terature, by its very essence, must.
Despite having been written almost a century ago, E.M. Forster’s complex work continues to exist as a paragon of literature, confounding the human mind and revealing to readers the unbidden consequences of the clash between two antithetical cultures. Perhaps appearing upon cursory glance to be merely a requiem for a bygone era, A Passage to India is in fact an affecting and enduring story that addresses not just one group or creed, but humankind as an entirety. Just like the variegated strokes of a piece of art, true works of literature generously open themselves to the world, beckoning all to uncover what it is to be human. So profoundly stirring the mind and soul, only when one brings such literature into their lives can the choking tendrils, the shroud of ignorance humankind has of its own condition, be finally blown asunder.

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Analysis Of ' A Passage Of India ' Essay

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