The Wonders Of The Invisible World Essay

The Wonders Of The Invisible World Essay

Length: 1064 words (3 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

“The Wonders of the Invisible World”, written by Cotton Mather, is an account of the Salem Witch Trials. He retells information that has been passed down to him without actually being present at the trial and simultaneously explains his theory to why witches were suddenly emerging in Salem, Massachusetts. There were quite a few holes in the Salem Witch Trials, especially regarding whether or not these events occurred the way they are said to. Mather’s book shows us how intense the Puritan ideals were, attaching anything out of the ordinary to a higher power and in doing this shows the flaws of the religion which caused to Salem Witch Trials.
Mather starts off The Wonders of the Invisible World by making a claim that the land in which they settled on belonged to the devil and as soon as he saw the Puritans colonizing there, it became his agenda to wipe them out through possession of them. “…a malefactor, accused of witchcraft as well as murder, and executed in this place more than forty years ago, did then give notice of an horrible plot against the country by witchcraft, and a foundation of witchcraft then laid, which if it were not seasonably discovered, would probably blow up, and pull down all the churches in the country.” (Mather 152) The colonial settlers had to be uneasy about starting a new life in unfamiliar territory, and clung to their newfound religion away from the Church of England for comfort. They assigned anything and everything to either an act of God or an act of the devil, and in doing this they caused an extreme uproar in their community and, eventually, in history. Innocent lives were executed as a result of the unrealistic belief system. The method they used was placing the fear of God in people as a form of...


... middle of paper ...


...highly motivated by Puritan reasoning and his use of this in this testimony is what shows how problematic it was because it sparked hatred towards those who were different. The judges were unable to investigate these events logically, and took word of mouth as evidence. Three women who testified against her claimed that they had taken part of the witchcraft that she was accused of, and had seem her at their witch-meetings. There was no evidence of this, yet the fear of God and the devil lead them to take the women’s word for it and execute a woman without proper investigation.
The Salem Witch Trials were fueled by the fear of God strategically placed in the people of Salem by Puritan ideals. Mather represents this through The Wonders of the Invisible World and shows how women were targeted for showing any sign of rebellion against the Puritan standard.











Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

The Wonders Of The Invisible World Essay

- “The Wonders of the Invisible World”, written by Cotton Mather, is an account of the Salem Witch Trials. He retells information that has been passed down to him without actually being present at the trial and simultaneously explains his theory to why witches were suddenly emerging in Salem, Massachusetts. There were quite a few holes in the Salem Witch Trials, especially regarding whether or not these events occurred the way they are said to. Mather’s book shows us how intense the Puritan ideals were, attaching anything out of the ordinary to a higher power and in doing this shows the flaws of the religion which caused to Salem Witch Trials....   [tags: Salem witch trials, Puritan, Witchcraft]

Better Essays
1064 words (3 pages)

Essay about The Wonders Of The Invisible World

- Written in the late 17th century, “The Wonders of the Invisible World” by Cotton Mather is a timeless work in which he wrote against the presumed witchcraft that was taking place at Salem, Massachusetts. At the time, descendants of the puritans that arrived with the Massachusetts Bay Colony believed that Satan was real and he wandered this earth; therefore, the supernatural was part of everyday life. Prominent puritans believed God was the only thing protecting them. Puritans ascribed their losses and misfortune to external forces conspiring against them....   [tags: Salem witch trials, Witchcraft, Puritan, Woman]

Better Essays
1775 words (5.1 pages)

God in the 'Devil’s Territories:' Mather's Use of Rhetoric in Wonders of the Invisible World

- ... But what is odd about the way he is arguing his point is that he does not appear to be arguing; he appears to be merely stating facts. As he says near the end of A People of God in the Devil’s Territories, “I report matters not as an advocate, but as a historian,”, saying also, “You are to take the truth.”. And yet, these facts seem tailored to convince the people, if they have not already been convinced, of the guilt of the people accused as witches. He uses ‘claim of consequence’, a form of logos that states that one thing is caused by another, to show us the guilt of Martha Carrier, accused of witchcraft....   [tags: use of extrinsic and intrinsic ethos, Puritans]

Better Essays
1273 words (3.6 pages)

Essay on Analysis of the Invisible Man

- Never fitting in, the invisible man has learned to conquer his surroundings and finally lead a life for himself. He thought that by moving to the North he would no longer be suppressed because of the color of his skin. Unfortunately things didn't change much for the narrator, so he decided to make another change in his life. He decided to become invisible. With this change, he went from trying to fit in to being able to do whatever he wants. Instead of taking the harsh words and racist actions, he finally could stick up for himself....   [tags: vengeance, accepting, invisible, music]

Better Essays
1188 words (3.4 pages)

Character Analysis of Brother Jack and Brother Tod in Ralph Ellison’s, The Invisible Man

- Ralph Ellison’s “The Invisible Man”, is a novel that reveals the characters psychological growth. Also, in this novel the story revolves around the narrator as an individual. In this novel the narrator relates the whole story in a first person point of view in which his name is never revealed. The narrator remains a voice throughout the entire novel, never establishing a concrete presence in the story. This is why he is looked at as an “invisible man.” In the novel, he is an African American who is extremely vulnerable to the pressure that society put upon him....   [tags: The Invisible Man]

Better Essays
689 words (2 pages)

Invisible Man Essay: Tone and Language

- Tone and Language in Invisible Man       There are not many novels that can produce such a feeling of both sorrow and jubilation for a character as Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man. There is such a wide range of emotions produced by the novel that it is impossible not to feel both ways. Invisible Man is a wonderfully well written novel about an African American living in pre civil rights America. The novel is an excellent example of a bildungsroman, a character finding himself as the story progresses....   [tags: Invisible Man Essays]

Better Essays
961 words (2.7 pages)

Invisible Man Essay

- Invisible Man is a story told through the perspective of the narrator, a Black man struggling in a White culture. The term “invisible man” truly idealizes not only the struggles of a black man but also the actual unknown identity of the narrator. The story starts during the narrator’s college days where he works hard and earns respect from the college administration. Dr. Bledsoe, a Black administrator of the school, becomes the narrator’s friend. Dr. Bledsoe has achieved success in the White culture which becomes the goal which the narrator seeks to achieve....   [tags: Book Review]

Better Essays
1471 words (4.2 pages)

Seven Wonders of the Ancient World Essays

- While the ancient world left little written record, the evidence that we do have depicts it as far more advanced and culturally rich than many would expect. From the Phoenicians in Mesopotamia to the Mayans in Central America, technological advancements and complex theories drove the ancient civilizations ahead. Great thinkers from that period like Socrates (other great thinkers) left huge marks on the literary world. Great scientists like Copernicus (other great scientists) developed theories that provided the foundations for more modern thought....   [tags: History, Herodotus, List of Wonders]

Better Essays
2228 words (6.4 pages)

Year of Wonders by Geraldine Brooks Essay

- The premise of the novel (Year of Wonders) could be seen as the antithesis of a journey as the villagers voluntarily agree to undertake a quarantine, which means they literally cannot go anywhere. In what way does this text represent a journey. Though the characters in Year of Wonders are unable to take a physical journey due to their actions, their circumstances cause them to embark on many spiritual, mental and emotional journeys through the course of the novel. Anna Frith, for instance, is forced during the plague year to overcome the deaths of her sons and family, and take upon many new roles that she otherwise would not have....   [tags: Year of Wonders, Geraldine Brooks]

Better Essays
840 words (2.4 pages)

The Statue Of The Ancient World Essay example

- In the world today, there are many spectacular sculptures and artworks. The statue of Zeus at Olympia was possibly the most famous statue in the ancient world. It is known to be one of the seven wonders of the ancient world. The Greek sculptor Phidias made it about 435 BC, and dedicated to Zeus the king of gods. The statue of Zeus was the greatest statue to be built in Greece. The artists of this statue captured the royalty of the king by seating Zeus on a throne to inspire tremendous awe in all that witnessed this statue....   [tags: Olympic Games, Ancient Olympic Games, Olympia]

Better Essays
1018 words (2.9 pages)