Free William Pitt the Younger Essays and Papers

Satisfactory Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Powerful Essays
Best Essays
  • Better Essays

    William Pitt the Younger was born on May 28, 1759, in Kent, England. The younger Pitt was the fourth of five children born to William Pitt the Elder and his wife Lady Hester Grenville. William was always the favorite son of Pitt the Elder. His father was appointed Earl of Chatham in 1766. As a result this, William’s political status later in life was affected by his father’s previous position. Pitt was a fragile, sickly child, and inherited gout. Gout is a form of arthritis that causes sudden, severe

    • 1312 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    George III of Britain: Popular with the People, but not with Parliament Although history has labeled King George III of Britain primarily as the “mad” king responsible for the loss of America, a closer look at the 1780s, the heart of his reign, proves George III to be a particularly effective monarch rather than the bungling idiot some scholars have dubbed him. George III’s effectiveness, during the 1780s, stemmed from his immense popularity with the common people, which lay in direct contrast

    • 2136 Words
    • 5 Pages
    • 5 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    George Canning Biography

    • 769 Words
    • 2 Pages

    of Fox, George Canning met the Tory, William Pitt. The two men became friends and in 1793 Pitt helped Canning become MP for the rotten borough of Newtown in the House of Commons. In 1796 William Pitt appointed Canning as secretary of state for Foreign Affairs. This was the first of a series of posts held under Pitt that included: commissioner of the board of control (1799-1800), paymaster-general (1800-1801) and treasurer of the navy (1801). After Pitt resigned in 1801, Canning joined the

    • 769 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Pembroke

    • 758 Words
    • 2 Pages

    are now en-couraged from all quarters with an intake of 57% from state schools and a roughly even gender divide, women being first admitted in 1983. There are 250 postgraduates and 430 undergraduates. Youngest ever British prime minister, William Pitt the Younger, studied at Pembroke and resided until elected as an MP in 1780, eventually becoming PM in 1783. Pembroke Women’s College at Brown University U.S.A. was named after the Cambridge establishment. Pembroke is the third oldest in the university

    • 758 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Minister, William Pitt the Younger who was the party in power, and the opposing party, the Whigs, who were led by Charles James Fox, who was also close friends with the Prince of Wales, the King’s eldest son. The sickness of the King brought out the parties personal gains and revealed what kind of people they were. The Prince and the Whigs saw the King’s madness and wanted to take the opportunity to make him the prince regent. This would ultimately put the Whigs to the primary party in power. Pitt saw

    • 917 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Real Christians by William Wilberforce

    • 1244 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 7 Works Cited

    1. William Wilberforce modelled Christianity in his life in many ways. He was a passionate abolitionist who worked tirelessly for twenty years to stop the slave trade (notes). The film, Amazing Grace, revealed the enormous involvement Wilberforce contributed in doing what he could for the slave trade. He once wrote, "So enormous, so dreadful, so irremediable did the trade's wickedness appear that my own mind was completely made up for abolition. Let the consequences be what they would: I from this

    • 1244 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 7 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Britain but was the last foreign British monarch. ● King George III ○ Another king of Great Britain. This George’s time of being in power was known as a reign involving difficulties with the military. This king also suffered from a mental illness ● William Pitt the Elder ○ Whig who led Britain during the 7 Years’ War and who became a wartime political leader of Britain ○ Gen. James Wolfe ● He was a British army officer who led Britain to their victory during the Bat... ... middle of paper ... ...

    • 1757 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Contribution of both Gladstone and Disraeli to British Politics Between 1846 and 1865 The debate over the Corn Laws in 1846 brought Gladstone and Disraeli much closer to the forefront of British Politics. Gladstone was part of the Tory party led by his mentor Peel who supported the abolition of the Corn Laws and in essence supported Free Trade. The Tory party were divided on whether to support Free Trade; Disraeli was a leading player in the section of the Tory party, which wanted to keep

    • 1093 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Tory Government from 1822 to 1830 The period of 1822-1830 saw the origins of modern day democracy forming in Britain. It could be said that Britain was going through a political revolution, this was following on from the industrial, agricultural and social revolutions, which had occurred, in the previous 100 years. The reforms which took place under Tory rule was not due to their genuine desire for reform but more the case that if there was no reform then their would have been more widespread

    • 1566 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Robert Peel’s Reorganisation of the Tory Party as the Most Important Factor in the 1841 Election After the Tories’ worst ever election defeat in 1832, many spectators felt that they would never re-establish themselves as a political force. In introducing the Great Reformations Bill that same year, the Whig party had given an extra eight percent of men the vote. This increase from two to ten percent, publicly opposed by the Tories, was expected to make the Whigs eternally popular. However

    • 1426 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Architects of the 1832 Reform Act Were Conservative in their Aims The main aim of the Reform Act of 1832 as far as those in Parliament were concerned, was to qualm the ever-growing calls made by vast numbers of the British public for a movement of reform and ensure that aristocratic government could be maintained. Democracy was not an entity that Members of Parliament wanted to envisage, something which was emphasised by the French revolution of 1789. By passing the Reform Act of 1832

    • 1697 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    There were many reasons why between 1830 and 1832 parliamentary reform became a big and unyielding issue on the political landscape. The industrial revolution was in full swing, discontent was rife and consequently revolutionary ideas were materialising. But how did the parliamentary reform gain momentum and become such a significant matter among so many other pressing conflicts and issues? The Tory party were in office prior to parliamentary reform and for years they had time and again strenuously

    • 772 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    businesses in Manchester closed. Around the country there were high bread prices for two reasons, firstly, the failing economy and secondly, there was a bad harvest from 1829 to 1830. There was also a lingering threat of radicalism around this time. William Cobbett was a renowned reformer, and encouraged a call for... ... middle of paper ... ...inister. Wellington was an Ultra-Tory; this caused a lot of friction in the party. Although Wellington and Peel were very strong leaders, Huskisson and the

    • 814 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    At the end of the Eighteenth Century, Great Britain had attained a magnitude of power and global influence, which led many Englishmen to assume, incorrectly, that a new Roman Empire had come about. A period of "prosperity and glory unknown to any other age" seemed to be opening for Great Britain and its colonies. Yet, in a few short years, through a war with its American colonies, it became evident the British Empire would eventually meet the same inauspicious decline and fall as the Roman Empire

    • 1000 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 4 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    his place as the Foreign secretary and Sir Robert Peel became the leader of the House of Commons. Other changes were within the positions of Chancellor of the Exchequer and President of the board of Trade. The new members of the cabinet were younger, more in touch with the new merchant classes and were not as ultra as the previous members. This may have been one of the first problems the Tories had created for themselves. The new members of the team were going to be more liberal, unlike the

    • 804 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Extent to Which Fear and Pragmatism were the Major Factors in the Passing of the Great Reform Act There were a lot of major factors surrounding the passing of the Great Reform Act, with a continuous fear of revolution by the radicals and the collaboration of the working and middle classes. The situation worsened with the collapse of the Whig government and this led to the, somewhat pragmatic, eventual passing of the Act in 1832. One of the reasons why the Great Reform Act was passed

    • 1182 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Period 1783-1815 There are a number if contributing factors, both long and short term that led to the downfall of the Whig party in the years 1783-1815. Firstly, the Whig party itself had alienated themselves from the King, George III. Unlike Pitt, whose success derived directly from the Kings favour, the Whigs had continued to express their views against royal patronage. The Whigs believed the power of the monarch should be reduced and made no attempt to hide their ambitions, during the

    • 566 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    they could have all happened if there had not been any French wars there are obvious links between political changes in the period and the dramatic events in France. The wars increased the parliamentary majority of the party of government (i.e. Younger Pitt's government). Because Britain was at war with France all that France symbolised was unpopular, therefore Pitt's determination to resist radical change at home and revolution abroad was bound to prove incredibly popular and steal many of

    • 837 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    literature, William Wilberforce's story followed the archetype of a traditional hero. William Wilberforce was an example of a common mortal hero. He was a normal, completely realistic person, in that he stumbled many times and often emphasized his humanity by saying, ?Am I not a man?? After years of work without success he felt he had failed, but he still pressed forward. He possessed no extraordinary power or skill, but he rose to the occasion and changed the world. Not only was William one of the

    • 680 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Death of Lord Liverpool as the Most Important Reason for the Collapse of the Tory Ministries The strength of Lord Liverpool, cruelly described by Benjamin Disraeli as the “arch mediocrity,” was brought to attention after his death in 1828. It was clear that his moderate stance towards controversial issues had helped to unite a much-divided party. In unifying the “High” and “Low” Tories, the “Catholics” and the “Protestants,” Liverpool had succeeded where his successors would fail. However

    • 942 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays