Free Psychological trauma Essays and Papers

Satisfactory Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Powerful Essays
Best Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Psychological Trauma

    • 1649 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 12 Works Cited

    The term “Psychological trauma” refers to damage wrought from a traumatic event, which that damages one’s ability to cope with stressors. “Trauma” is commonly defined as an exposure to a situation in which a person is confronted with an event that involves actual or threatened death or serious injury, or a threat to self or others’ physical well-being (American Psychiatric Association, 2000). Specific types of client trauma frequently encountered by which therapists and other mental health workers

    • 1649 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 12 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    defined trauma as being “the result from an event, series of events, or set of circumstances that is experienced by an individual as physically or emotionally harmful or threatening and that has lasting adverse effects on the individual’s functioning and physical, social, emotional, or spiritual well-being ("Trauma and Justice, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration", 2012). Physical or psychological traumas can affect the developing brain of children. Physical trauma can cause

    • 797 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Trauma has been proven to be a source of deadly illnesses, and approximately seventy percent of the population encounter a traumatic situation. Expressing trauma experiences can feel strenuous. This allows the issue to go unnoticed, and worsen. Affecting many areas of the brain; trauma can alter the development of it. I have felt the burden of trauma, and decided it will not control my life. It is time to take a stand and face trauma head on. Trauma has two forms: physical and mental. Physical

    • 718 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    The Effects of Psychological Trauma on Family

    • 1085 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 5 Works Cited

    Psychological Trauma can alter, destroy and create a lot of bad impacts in a person’s life. The main definition of psychological trauma is the results of unique individual experience of an unusually event that invaded a person’s sense of security and safety, making he or she feels helpless and at risk of dangerous situation, and the ability to assimilate his or her emotional experience is overwhelmed at certain situation. (Lawrence Robinson, 2011) A much more serious psychological trauma can leads

    • 1085 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 5 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    The Psychological Damage of Sexual Trauma

    • 1283 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 12 Works Cited

    Approximately 39 million survivors of childhood sexual abuse exist in America today (Bull,2001). This figure continues to grow daily as perpetrators of this crime continue in this destructive path. To get a better understanding of what sexual trauma can do to a child the website all about counseling asked us to imagine “ a 6 year old being abused by a family member, say Uncle Joe. Uncle Joe has been very nice to the child up until the other day. He then steps across sexual boundaries, or even becomes

    • 1283 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 12 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    The psychological effects of trauma on behavior and personality are closely related. If a person has a traumatic experience in life, the mind can go through some changes to protect that person from themselves and the scarred memories that they’ve experienced. For example, a child that has been physically abused could develop a disorder that would not allow them to become close to people in general (Joel 1998). The trustworthiness of everyone that the victim came in contact with would be questioned

    • 590 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 4 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Preamble: Definition of Terms Psychological Trauma (text adapted from Horowitz) Psychological traumatization occurs when dire events lead to overwhelming fear, helplessness, or horror due to a situation being beyond one’s coping capacity (van der Kolk, McFarlane, Weisaeth, 1994). This leads to a sense of being unable to rely upon familiar ways of solving problems. The mismatch between traumatic circumstances and one’s existing schemas for interpreting the world evokes strong emotionally dissociative

    • 1202 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Brian Conniff's article, "Psychological Accidents: In Cold Blood and Ritual Sacrifice," explains how Truman Capote's nonfiction novel demonstrates the psychological trauma that the murderers and the townspeople of Holcomb face after the murders of the Clutter family. Conniff begins his article by stating that in the last twenty-five years imprisonment and execution has reached an all-time high level of obsession among the American public. Since this type of violence has been so normalized it

    • 903 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    religiosity. There are also various factors than can be attributed to the level or type or psychological trauma experienced within childhood. To provide data that is as accurate as possible, instead of relying on intuition and authority, past research will be analyzed to understand the effect of trauma on religiosity. It is from the analyses of past research that ideas concerning a relationship between psychological trauma during childhood and religious preference or levels of attachment to an omniscient

    • 571 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Kayla DiMarco Dr. Small English 1A 4 May 2014 Can MDMA Heal Psychological Trauma? When you think of the drug “Ecstasy,” you probably imagine horror stories in which a naive teenage was found dead of the dance floor after blowing a whistle non-stop for three days. While there have certainly been reported deaths caused by the substance inside of Ecstasy, the drug is much safer than most people in the general public believe. The substance in Ecstasy is a drug that the public knows little about, which

    • 1990 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Psychological Warfare and Trauma The First World War is considered one of the deadliest conflicts in history, its more than nine million casualties exacerbated by the advancement in war technology. However, the physical damage the war inflicted on its participants pales in comparison to the emotional scars seared into the minds of these young men. The modest percentage of veterans who had survived the carnage still returned home ruined by the bloodshed. Not only did these warriors have to cope with

    • 1212 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Discussion Disasters are destructive environmental, unintended, or malicious events that result in damaging fiscal and social consequences for the inhabitants affected; this includes injury, death, property damage, psychological hardship, infrastructure, and operational systems failures. (Donahue & Tuohy, 2006, p. xx) Lusitania Disaster A German U-boat submarine fired a torpedoed that sank the Lusitania, on May 7th, 1915, killing 1,195, including 123 U.S. Citizens. The British cruise liner set

    • 1039 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    I agree with the statement that suicide is an inter-generational response to trauma. As human beings we are comprised, affected and influenced by many different things, starting from conception or even before conception, such as inheritance genetic material or historical trauma, environmental and spiritual influences. I feel that ancestry, genealogy individual or collective spirt can be damaged or affected by passed events, which can manifest in the physical and in the present. Our sprit is part

    • 583 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Australian casualties and 8,000 of those being deaths in the heat of battle; however, not all of the casualties that survived the ordeal had physical injuries alone. There were many different types of trauma that the soldiers experienced apart from the physical damage to their bodies, such as short term psychological ailments such as Battle Fatigue and Shellshock from living in a constant life or death situation, and also dealing with the after effects of war with their families back home and the long term

    • 860 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    org - How Single Event Traumas Can Lead To Addiction Sooner or later, we all through a traumatic event that makes life more difficult for us to handle. Trauma can be a sustained series of events (such as an abusive relationship) or a single event. Sadly, even a single traumatic event may compel someone to turn to drugs and alcohol. In fact, it can even cause to addiction to these substances, throwing a person 's life even further off track. Understanding how single event trauma can lead to addiction

    • 1382 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Trauma and Attachment

    • 1289 Words
    • 3 Pages

    relationship between trauma and attachment is both complicated and intriguing, which is what drove me to answer this question and conduct further research on the topic. In order to understand the correlations between trauma and attachment, both terms must be defined and expanded upon. First of all, what is trauma? Dr. Jody Todd Manly defined it as: “….a response to a perceived threat to survival or emotional well-being of an individual or large group such as a community or a culture. Trauma leads to adverse

    • 1289 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Trauma Loss Theory

    • 861 Words
    • 2 Pages

    death of a friend and mentor who has contributed greatly in the psychological field. Harvey, Barnett, and Overstreet (2004) find this loss is relevant in the wide spectrum of loss and traumatic events because loss, a form of trauma, effect personal growth. The basis of this study focuses on the many differing results of loss and trauma, not just positive outcomes but more generally the qualitative changes within a person, and relates trauma itself as being a specific form of loss (Harvey, et al, 2004)

    • 861 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    one an easy foray into the neurobiology of the disorder. Cathy Caruth, a leading trauma theorist, discusses the definition of PTSD: "While the precise definition of post-traumatic stress disorder is contested, most descriptions generally agree that there is a response, sometimes delayed, to an overwhelming event or events, which takes the form of rep... ... middle of paper ... ... , by Cathy Caruth, a leading trauma theorist. http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/bb/neuro/neuro02/web3/ 2) Sensorimotor

    • 1874 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 7 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Essay On Trauma

    • 700 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Trauma is an incident that leads to a great suffering of body or mind. It is a severe torture to the body and breaks the body’s natural equilibrium. It is defined as an emotional wound causing a psychological injury. Immediately after the event, shock and denial are typical. Longer term reactions include unpredictable emotions, flashbacks and strained relationships There are many types of trauma that can affect an adolescent and without the proper treatment of the traumatic event the adolescent can

    • 700 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Trauma In Mental Health

    • 1021 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The recognition of the role of psychological trauma on people’s mental health has become more prevalent in modern society due to various societal problems such as childhood physical and sexual abuse, domestic violence, shootings, mass killings, riots, serious accidents, terrors, natural disasters, illness, and death of close one, especially sudden death. Direct or indirect exposure to these various traumatic events can lead to psychological trauma which can result in behavioral and emotional disorder

    • 1021 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays