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Free Logging Essays and Papers

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    Salvage Logging

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    Salvage Logging Proponents: Legislators and the timber industry Opponents: Forest Service Employees for Environmental Ethics (FSEEE) Legislators have defined "salvage logging" as the act of logging unhealthy forest stands, considered to have a probability of experiencing extreme insect and disease infestation of catastrophic fire. However, no scientific consensus exists for describing an unhealthy forest, predicting or classifying catastrophic fire event, or classifying the resultant damage

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    Analysis of the Logging Industry

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    Have you ever wondered where all of the products made of wood came from? How about all of the lumber that you use when you build something in your own backyard? Well, recently I have grown interested in the logging industry. The life style of a lumberjack is very intriguing to me. I find the places they work to the actual type of work they do to be very appealing. Honestly, I am not very sure where my interest for this topic came from, but I do know one thing, and that is that without the industry

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    History of the Logging Industry

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    Logging Logging in america started out as a means to harvest wood for shipbuilding in the 1600’s for the british royal navy, and is considered one of the world’s most dangerous jobs. At first the major use of lumber was for ship building, but with the spring of the industrial revolution, demand increased. Towards the 20th century the midwest timber supply dwindled, so the pacific northwest came out on top as the center of the logging industry. When it started the men who cut timber were called

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    Clear Cut Logging and Other Options Have you ever awakened on a beautiful sunny morning in the Southwest planning on going for a hike in the Cascade Mountains, but when you arrive at your destination there are only stumps? This is the result of clear-cut logging. The negative aspects of logging, by far, outweigh the benefits. Clear-cut logging is the practice of harvesting all the trees in a specifically marked area. Another logging method is a selective cut which is the harvesting

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    Logging on Public Land Must be Restricted

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    canvas of green for miles. The Mark Twain National Forest. As I turned my head however, the canvas of green became more like a patchwork quilt. One square mile of forest, another square mile of nothing except stumps and slash, the waste products of a logging clear-cut. The loggers had taken what they needed and left, allowing nature to take over where they left off, to start again from nothing. As I walked down the hill from my perch I noticed the roads which were made of dirt and were marked with

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    I walk along the narrow logging road, scuffing my feet in the four inch dust. I am delighted to see my dad's big, green skidder, a machine used to drag logs from the woods to the road, up ahead, hopping over stump after stump. I scan the small, freshly-cut patch of aspen trees, lying in the luscious bed of fallen leaves. In his skidder, my dad carefully backs up to the butts of the trees and grabs them up in one skillful sweep of the giant grapple. The huge machine gently speeds to a constant

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    Logging on Public Lands: A Chainsaw Massacre As long as humans have lived in forested areas, they have cut down trees for lumber and/or to clear space for agricultural purposes. However, this practice has resulted in the destruction and near extinction of our national forests. Today, fewer than five percent of our country's original forests remain (Thirteen) and the U.S. Forest Service continues to allow more than 136,000 square miles to be logged each year (Byrant). Even more alarming, is the

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    Illegal Logging Effecting Earth

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    Introduction: Illegal logging occurs throughout every region of the Earth whether a vulnerable region such as the smaller countries in the Amazon Basin, Southeast Asia, or Central Africa along with more developed areas such as North America, the Russian Frontier, and Europe. Illegal logging is defined as harvesting, transporting, purchasing, or selling timber in violation of national law. Illegal logging includes collecting woods that are located in protected areas, distributing threatened plant

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    Logging

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    features that occur in the valley include limestone caves, tannin-stained Styx River, and several waterfalls. Now to the bad news… Most of the giants of the Styx are threatened by logging. Between 300 and 600 hectares of the Styx Valley are logged each year. The main form of logging is clear felling and burning. The logging operations proceed by cutting down all the large timber and bulldozing the rest. The useful timber, primarily destined for woodchips, is removed and the area is then bombed from

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    toward sustainable forestry management. Unfortunately, poverty has driven people in developing countries to clear-cut large tracts of land, while instability and corruption have rendered developing country governments powerless to stop illegal logging and trade in illegal forest products. The results have been staggering. The World Resources Institute recently reported that tropical regions have been deforested at an alarming rate of 1% annually since 1985; in some countries, the rate has spiraled

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