Free Humorism Essays and Papers

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    Some things are not as they seem. “Ring Around the Rosie” seems like a pleasant children’s nursery rhyme, but many believe it is actually a grisly song about the Black Death in Europe. The Black Death was a serial outbreak of the plague during the 1300s. During the Black Death, more than 20 million Europeans died. One-third of the population of the British Isles died from the plague. Moreover, one-third of the population of France died in the first year alone, and 50% of the people in France’s

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    The Practice of Phlebotomy

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    phlebotomy was once viewed as horrific and repulsive, but it has become an art in which the human race has worked diligently at to bring a perception of healing and understanding towards the patient. The practice of Phlebotomy originated from humorism. Humorism was a theory, later being discredited, that was adopted by ancient Greek and Roman philosophers explaining the structure and mechanisms of the human body. Hippocrates, the father of medicine, believed that there were four basic elements to existence:

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    John Hunter's Life and Accomplishments

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    distinguished doctors today swear by the Hippocratic Oath (Passions and Tempers 1) and use the Corpus Hippocratum as their standard of practice (Medical Ethics 1). Hippocrates is most known for discovering diseases and keyed the central theories involving humorism. He focused the wellbeing of one’s body rather than praying to deities and unnecessary sacrifices (Nlm 1). This included restoring one’s humors by exercising, dieting and the occasional phlebotomy (Nlm 2). Elder forms of surgery also include trepanation

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    The Opening Scene in Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet The Prologue The prologue is the first thing that is said in the play, and it's point is to tell you what the play is about. It is written in sonnet form giving a brief outline of the play, that is the first four lines are leading you into the play, setting the scene, giving you the background information you need so you can understand the play. This is so the first scene is not spent describing life up until that point. The rest of

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    Shakespearean sonnets appear to be arranged in three parts; the first third of the sonnets appear to be directing the recipient of the poems to reproduce to endure his legacy, the second third highlight the ability of the immortalizing abilities of the sonnets and with the latter third there is the appearance of a dark haired lady - possibly a tongue-and-cheek humor of the Petrarchan sonnet. Sonnet 147, as one of the latter third sonnets, appears to be directed to the dark haired lady; as a anti-love

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    The History of Medicine

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    Medicine has always been a big part in helping people get better, it has been around for a long time. You could go back hundreds of years and find some sort of medicine that as been around. It all started with Hippocrates, he was a doctor in 400 BC in Ancient Greece. He has come up with the idea of the four humors. The four humors were: blood, phlegm, yellow bile, and black bile. He believed if these were imbalanced then you would become ill. The second person that came into the medicine world

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    Bloodletting Essay

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    Bloodletting is one of the oldest procedures in our society. It goes all the way back to thousands of years ago and many different cultures used it. Considered one of medicine’s oldest practices, bloodletting is thought to have originated in ancient Egypt. It then spread to Greece, where physicians such as Erasistratus, who lived in the third century B.C., believed that all illnesses stemmed from an overabundance of blood, or plethora. In the second century A.D., the influential Galen of Pergamum

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    Phrenology Rubbing fingers and palms across a person’s head in order to analyze that person’s mental aptitude is the basis of phrenology. This was a common practice during the 19th century. It became especially popular in the latter half of the 19th century, around the same time great advances were being made with the telephone. Although these two topics were developing in the same era, they differ greatly in relevancy to today’s world, nearly 200 years later. The telephone is a means of long-distance

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    Before the humoral theory was developed, it was believed that angry gods or evil spirits were the causing factors of disease. In order to cure themselves, people had to beg the gods for forgiveness or rid the evil spirits from their body. In turn, the priests who performed the healing became the first known physicians (Francko 372). This theory of magic being the cause of disease was believed for many years throughout the people. It was not until a Greek physician proposed a different theory being

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    Early Doctors, Surgeons, and Apothecaries

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    In the 18th century, the medical field was made up of mostly men. There were three jobs in this field: Physicians, Surgeons, and Apothecaries. Physicians were the most elite of the three. Physicians in the 18th century had no knowledge of anything. Nobody knew that disease was spread by bacteria, germs, and viruses. Because they didn’t know this, nobody practiced sterilization or hygiene, hospital and personal. In the 18th century, scientists were strongly influenced by theories. In 350 B.C., Aristotle

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    With each passing moment, with each tick of the second hand on a clock, humans learn more about themselves and the natural world that surrounds them. In the past, knowledge was not always based on fact. Rather observation and cultural and religious influences dictated schools of thought. Over two thousand years ago, in the years between 460-377 B.C., ancient Greek physician and philosopher Hippocrates, developed the humoral theory of medicine. A theory that would shepard medicine for the next two

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    Hippocratic Medicine

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    Introduction Hippocratic medicine remains one of Ancient Greece's lasting contributions to the field of science. Lacking the equipment physicians today take for granted when diagnosing and healing their patients, Hippocratic physicians were forced to create a novel system for explaining and curing disease based upon the prevalent scientific theories of their era. This system became known as the humoral theory of disease. Humoral theory incorporated the theories of Presocratic philosophers in order

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    Medicine

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    On the other hand, some women did study and practice science, even though they were not allowed to go to university. A few noble women hired scientists to teach them about new discoveries. Some wealthy women had laboratories in their homes, where they did chemistry experiments and prepared and experimented with different medical drugs, most of them made from plants (Mullins 8). Most women knew several simple medicines she could make from ingredients in her kitchen, garden, or farm. These medicines

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    The Four Humors

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    The Four Humors Medieval doctors had quite an understanding of the human anatomy, considering their lack of equipment and knowledge. Most doctors in medieval times were philosophers more than actual medical doctors as most people know them today. Much of the knowledge they did acquire may have only been speculation, but quite a bit of it was due to concentrated observation. Many scientists studied wounds and diseases intensely and one scientist in particular, Empedocles, came to the conclusion

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    God Has the Cure

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    Throughout the ages great thinkers and men with revolutionary ideas have been changing the world of understanding. During the Renaissance men like Vesalius, William Hervey, and Paracelsus revolutionize the understanding of medicine through the use of dissection and constant studying. However these men did not find change easy, the Christian Church was set in their ways and was reluctant to change. People where dying from unknown causes and the church had no answers. The Renaissance was a time for

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    Hippocrates Humoralism

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    Beginning around 460 BC, the concept of humoralism emerged throughout the written works of Hippocrates. These early works, some of the only medical works of this detailed nature to survive this period, delineated one of the first ways scholars and physicians viewed the body and more importantly illness. Shaped by the Hippocratics’ version of humoralism and his own interpretations of their written works, Galen resolutely supported the fundamental four-element theory, the notion of the four humors

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    Claudius Galen of Pergamum

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    Claudius Galen of Pergamum Claudius Galen was a second century physiologist, philosopher, and writer who is often considered the most important contributor to medicine following Hippocrates. Even though Galen is fairly well known, his fame does not compare to that of Hippocrates, so Galen's reputation and work are often underscored by Hippocrates' notoriety. While Galen's name is mentioned in most sources about ancient medicine, usually only a small portion of the piece is dedicated to his

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    Roman and Greek Medical Ideas There was a great deal of continuity between the medical ideas of the Greeks and Romans, but there was also some change. Although the Greeks were the first to suggest that the Gods did not cause and cure illness, there were still some believers in 'faith healing'. This was the same in the Roman times. A prime example of this belief is when the plague hit Rome in 295 BC. The people were beginning to get desperate, after they had tried many herbal cures, so they

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    Herophilos: The Father of Modern Science

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    Herophilos, the Father of Modern Science: A Brief Biography In Ancient Greece 335 B.C.E. a child was born in Chalcedon. This child would one day become one of the most influential parts of modern science and medicine as we know it. The baby boy’s name was Herophilos. Not much is known about Herophilos except that he moved away from Chalcedon (now Turkey) and moved to Alexandria early in his life (1). When Herophilos finished his education he became a teacher and an author (1). There are

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    King Lear and Madness in the Renaissance

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    King Lear and Madness in the Renaissance It has been demonstrated that Shakespeare's portrayal of madness parallels Bright's A Treatise of Melancholie (Wilson 309-20), yet, the medical model alone is insufficient to describe the madness of Shakespeare’ s King Lear. Shakespeare was not limited to a single book in his understanding of madness; he had at his disposal the sum total of his society's understanding of the issue. Since Lear's madness is derived from a mixture of sources, it can only

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