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    In year 1845, journalist John L. O’Sullivan used the phrase “manifest destiny” in an article to support the U.S. right to occupy new territories, saying: “[that claim is by the right of] our manifest destiny to overspread and to possess the whole of the continent which Providence has given us for the development of the great experiment of liberty and federated self-government entrusted to us” (Boyer 388). O’Sullivan proposed the idea that the expansion of the United States wouldn’t happen if it was

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    Expansionism in the late 19th/ Early 20th century Expansionism in America during the late nineteenth and early twentieth century shared many similarities and differences to that of previous American expansionist ideals. In both cases of American expansionism, the Americans believed that we must expand our borders in order to keep the country running upright. Also, the Americans believed that the United States was the strongest of nations, and that they could take any land they pleased. This

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    does not realize how much it is truly accustomed to expansionism. While establishing itself all those years ago, America became imperialistic because of ideas such as the Manifest Destiny, religious and habitual conversion, and geological strategy. These ideas, little did America know, carried with it to the late nineteenth-century and early twentieth century and became prominent in the way it expanded in the world. Past United States expansionism can still be seen in late nineteenth-century and early

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    Containment Of Communism

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    transformed their economy and status in the world from nothing but a declining empire to a super power once again. The Cold War was a long series of events in which the communist tried to spread their ideas of government and socialist economy, known as expansionism, and the United States and some of the other Western powers such as Great Britain tried to contain it. Containment, a term introduced by George F. Kennan, was the foreign policy the United States practiced from 1946 to 1991 when the Soviet Union

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    American Imperialism

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    resulted on our lives today. Imperialism is the policy or action by which one country controls another country or territory. Most such control is achieved by military means to gain economic and political advantages. Such a policy is also called expansionism. An expansionist state that obtains overseas territories follows a policy usually called colonialism. An imperialist government may wish to gain new markets for its exports, plus sources of inexpensive labor and raw materials. A far-flung empire

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    Analysis of manifest destiny as depicted in Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy Violence has always been part of society. A cursory glance at the evolutionary periods to the classical ages up to the modern time shows that many breakthroughs were made after violent upheavals to either remedy the wrongs in society or to ensure survival of one group against the other. Such instances include the wars for territory where one group was faced by extinction if they didn’t rise up in arms such as the regular

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    Expansionism Essay

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    and industrialization of the work process. However, a new approach to foreign policy became a turning point in America’s history. After the Spanish American War, The U.S. received new territorial claims, opening up a road to imperialism. The new expansionism ideals and tactics presented a great departure from U.S.’s former techniques. Americans broadened the concept of “Manifest Destiny”, focused on obtaining resources, and supported war, just to acquire land for personal gain. Thus, there are only

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    Western Expansionism

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    The pressures of white expansionism led the United States Government to find ways to remove the Native Americans from their fertile lands. Spurred by this pressure, and the need to fulfill his campaign promise to open Indian land for settlement, Andrew Jackson pushed through Congress the Removal Act. The Act allowed the government to negotiate treaties with the various Native American tribes, pay them for their lands, relocate them to western lands, and support the tribes for one year after removal

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    god. Similar to the intentions of the early Europeans, expansionism brought with it reflections of profit, patriotism, piety, and politics. (Nash and Jeffery 604) One of America’s main goals was to create a model society for which others would follow by example. Since the beginning of the 17th century Thomas Jefferson had begun the expansionist movement with the purchase of the Louisiana Territory in the early 1800’s. The goal of expansionism was mainly for soil rich with nutrients for agriculture

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    Expansionism overseas in the 1800’s became a very indispensable factor to the United States we know today. The issue of acquiring overseas territories in the 1800’s was very controversial because many citizens felt it was “un-American” because the U.S itself went through that with the colonization of Britain. However, the government did not consider that when taking into account the interest that came with taking these lands. Economically the Philippines gave the United States potential access to

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    American Expansionism

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    Declared on December 2, 1823, by U.S President James Monroe, the Monroe Doctrine was an open affirmation that the United States would resist any efforts by European nations to gain additional colonial territory in the Americas or to reestablish control of colonies that had won independence. The declaration, a unilateral announcement, successfully defined the western Hemisphere as a U.S domain of influence. Under the 1904 Roosevelt Corollary to the Monroe Doctrine, president Theodore Roosevelt declared

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    dignity. The foregone was one of the driving elements of the wars that took place during the Chou Dynasty. States found wanting given the unprecedented increase in the population. Radical expansionists’ policies became key determinant factors for states to survive. Mozi is rising commenting against violation of sovereignty of other states which by all standards defies the main principles of equality, freedom and fraternity . He argues that, states driven by partiality would destroy other states

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    The United States expansionism during the late nineteenth-century and early twentieth-century kept the main objective the same as the manifest destiny during the 1840s; American expansionism, however, was departing from its earlier principle in that, instead of expanding the nation westward across the continental of North America, America sought to extend its civilization to overseas territories, and to influence on other nations culturally, economically, politically, and militarily. With the idea

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    To what extent was the late nineteenth-century and early twentieth century United States expansionism a continuation of past United States expansionism and to what extent was it a departure? For almost 100 years since it's birth, U.S. foreign policy was based on expanding westward, protecting U.S. interests, and limiting foreign influence in the Americas. However after the development of a huge industrial economy, U.S. started to focus on the rest of the world. This happened because it needed

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    Germany’s fast and rapid growing expansionism led to many great things for their country, including answering the question of what their Identity is, economic boom that the country had never seen, and power the country had never had before. With all these great changes Germany was experiencing, one thing that came with it was a continuous desire for more power. These factors added together had only one conclusion, and that was war. With Germany becoming one unified nation-state and the creation of

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    drastically in nature from its original non-aggressive attitude to a largely assertive and belligerent temperament in the second half of its expansive conquest. In order to fully illustrate the changes in the motives and character of United States expansionism, the proliferation of boundary extension must be broken into two separate time periods – the acquisition of land in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, motivated solely by the need to build and establish a country, and the imperialistic expansion

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    Tweed Honors US History II September 4, 2014 Growth of America There is a very fine line between expansionism and imperialism. Expansionism is defined as a policy to increase a country’s size by expanding its territory, while imperialism can be defined as a policy of extending a country 's power and influence through diplomacy or military force. Expansionism is a good thing; if it were not for expansionism, the United States of America would not be one of the biggest powers in the world as it is today

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    As a nation born out of the desire to reject despotic rule and reinvent a new, non-Eurocentric model of the nation state, Americans during the nation’s nascent decades subscribed to a notion of anti-imperialism and relied upon a closed door approach to national foreign policy. Yet simultaneously, the United States engaged in acts of global expansion throughout the 18th and 19th centuries, and by the arrival of the 20th century, the nation had reached an ideological crossroad. Following a series

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    Expansionism, Isolationism and Exceptionalism: Dissonance in the American Self-Concept Each individual maintains within his own psyche an idea of who he is, an idea of his essential character which psychologists refer to as his ‘self-concept’. Actions he takes in life which are in line with this ideal of the self serve to further reinforce it, while those actions which fall outside the scope of this model provoke an uncomfortable tension in the mind between what impulse or necessity has caused him

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    The Western United States, Texas, and the northern territories of the Mexican Empire served as an area of expansionist controversy between 1820 and 1860. Expansionism of antebellum America was rooted in a number of current disputes casing it to evolve into a major political issue. Although slavery was a cause of expansion, it was just as important as other; spread of American institutions, Manifest Destiny, and the protection and prosperity of the nation were equally important. Slavery in itself

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