Free Euripides Essays and Papers

Sort By:
Satisfactory Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Powerful Essays
Best Essays

Free Euripides Essays and Papers

Page 1 of 50 - About 500 essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Life of Euripides

    • 922 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Life of Euripides Euripides, the last of the great tragedians, lived a life filled with controversy and moral issues that influenced, as well as appalled, many people of his time. Throughout the centuries he has gained more acceptance in the literary circles as well as in the eyes of the public. It is difficult to write about his life only because he lived so long ago and there are many different opinions and theories as to what is factual and what is not. What is known about his life, and how

    • 922 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Satire in the Tragedies of Euripides

    • 1433 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 6 Works Cited

    The world of Euripides' tragedies was one that espoused ancient ideas of religion. The belief in ancient legends that formed subject material for the tragic drama had passed. The crowd that attended the theater at this time did so as a sort of religious celebration. It was under these circumstances that Euripides had to bury what might have been his true beliefs, and instead replace them with ideas that would relate to his audience. This did not mean that Euripides had to forgo his beliefs entirely

    • 1433 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 6 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Evaluation of Euripides

    • 945 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Evaluation of Euripides Euripides has met the conventions of Attic Tragedy up to a particular extent. Although he was often criticised for his work, he followed the structure and cycles of the traditional tragedy. However, his stance on the themes and ideas set him apart from the other writers. It is unreasonable to compare Euripides with the traditional writers of Attic tragedy without understanding his

    • 945 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    of our future rest upon our decisions. These decisions come in all different shapes and sizes, and some have the potential to thrive our futures into greatness, while others can destroy our lives to the point of no return. In the play Medea, by Euripides he provides his audience with a dramatic story of a woman who will stop at nothing, to reach her goals of revenge. In Medea there are many significant decisions made throughout the story. The decision by Medea to let her desire for revenge rule her

    • 972 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Euripides' Medea

    • 761 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Euripides' Medea I see Medea as a woman who took a chance and stood up for herself. The kind of behavior that Medea displays was very rare for these times: she doesn?t accept the dramatic change in her life; she does something about it. On the other hand, Medea becomes so obsessed she loses herself to revenge. Medea is only heroic to an extent. Medea?s thirst for revenge begins when she finds out about her husbands unfaithfulness. Medea?s husband Jason decides to marry the princess Glauce

    • 761 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Sophocles vs Euripides

    • 1219 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Sophocles vs Euripides Sophocles’ and Euripides’ versions of Electra carry, among many similarities, a central theme of revenge. The characters, Electra and Orestes, must reunite to avenge their father’s murder. Misfortunately, in both versions the just solution leads the siblings to destroying their own mother. Both versions of Electra can be compared to Aeschylus’ Libation Bearers. However, they are both more dramatic, and more similar to each other than if each Electra was individually

    • 1219 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    control, is a chief concept that can “make or break” the relationship. Distribution of the ruling is frequently divided into males versus females. This partition leads to many conflicts and tribulations. In the catastrophic Greek play Medea, by Euripides, the liaison between Medea and Jason demonstrates how both males and females assert power in the relationship and how incorrect usage of this supremacy leads to dilemmas. Initially, males direct the lives all members in the relationship by either

    • 764 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Feminism in Medea by Euripides

    • 1004 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 3 Works Cited

    Feminism in Medea by Euripides The play Medea by Euripides challenges the dominant views of femininity in the patriarchal society of the Greeks. While pursuing her ambition Medea disregards many of the feminine stereotypes/ characteristics of the patriarchal Greek society. She questions the inequality of women in a patriarchal society, contradicts Jason?s chauvinist beliefs, challenges the stereotype that women are weak and passive and completely disregards the feminine role of motherhood. Feminism

    • 1004 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 3 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    forced or clichéd in our own contemporary setting, but in Euripides' time it would have been revolutionary, as tragedy generally spoke to the sufferings of a generic (perhaps idealized) individual, rather than a group. It would be a mistake, however, to claim that Medea's speech elaborates a clearly progressive political message, as her concluding remarks appeal to women's natural talent for devious manipulation (line 414). While Euripides' play manifests many revolutionary political sentiments, its

    • 650 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Medea In “The Medea” by Euripides, a classical tragedy written in 431 B.C.E, the playwright shows that one 's cleverness and need for revenge can lead to disaster. Medea leaves her family and her homeland, Colchis, with her husband, Jason, to Corinth. Jason then takes another woman to bed, and Medea begins to regret the past decisions she has made and what she has given up for him. Medea is then exiled from Corinth, because Creon, the king, knows the potential she has to do the most unimaginable

    • 1036 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
Previous
Page12345678950