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    Ethnography

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    Ethnography Personal experience and reflexivity should be used within anthropology as a tool to reflect on the culture that is being studied and not a refocusing of attention on the self. Works such as Dorinne Kondo’s “Dissolution and Reconstitution of Self,” use the idea of reflexivity as a mirror in which to view the culture being studied in a different manner. This use of reflexivity allows for the focus to stay on the culture being studied. A move away from this is the new branch of humanistic

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    Ethnography

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    Ethnography Works Cited Missing Reflexivity has recently been designated as an indicator of postmodernism in anthropological texts. In this context, the practice is attacked as self-indulgent narcissism, but its true scope reaches much further. While some ethnographic texts exhibit an overemphasis on the author, and his position within the work, this is one extreme of the range reflexivity, which also serves as a methodological tool, unincorporated into the writing, and as a means to account

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    Ethnography

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    Ethnography One of the most complex and interesting aspects of cultural anthropology is the ethnography. The idea of being able to read stories about groups of individuals is something that is intriguing to many people. With the ethnography, the authors many times feel that they have control and understanding over the individuals that they are writing about. Furthermore, many of these authors assume that the individuals among whom they are living and studying exemplify the entire society as

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    Ethnography

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    Ethnography Works Cited Missing Reflexivity is a qualitative method of research that takes an ethnography one step further, displaying the personal thoughts and reflections of the anthropologist on his informants. Ethnographies generally take an outside or foreign perspective of a culture, like reading a text, and reflexivity introduces a new component of inside description. Here, the anthropologist may describe personal interactions and experiences with natives and use this inside information

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    Furthermore, Hedican is describing the difficulties that reflexive understanding has brought to him and how it is a long process when conducting fieldwork. “Participant observation” is another key concept described in both Henry’s ethnography, as well as Hedican’s ethnography. My personal understanding is that participant observation means living in a culture that is not your own while also keeping a detailed record of your observations and interviews. Also, it is described as a research method to gain

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    Writing an Ethnography

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    even more pertinent if posed about ethnographies. An ethnography is, by nature, meant to be a description of a people (the dictionary definition actually refers to “scientific description of individual cultures,” but that brings up questions about the meaning of “scientific” and “culture”). How can a people (or a culture) be described truthfully? And what is the relationship between the idealized pursuit of truth and ethical practices? In writing an ethnography, both what the ethnographer sees (as

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    or something to be apprehensive of. Ethnography helps society learn about culture by fully immersing yourself in the culture. By observing, learning and participating in various cultures it can eliminate a lot of apprehension as well as broaden your ability to accept others. Throughout this essay, I will answer a few questions associated with ethnography and how studying a culture can help our own society progress as well. It is important to know what ethnography is, as well as methods that can be

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    ​Anthropology, which originated as the study of none industrial peoples, is a comparative science that now extends to all societies, ancient modern, simple, and complex. To become a cultural anthropologist, one must do ethnography which is the firsthand, personal study of local settings. Ethnographer is based on fieldwork requires spending a year or more in another society, living, with the local people and learning about their way of life or local behavior. The ethnographer wanted to create a holistic

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    impression is that there is more hunting done for sport now than there is for necessary protein harvest, but will there be a movement in the other direction? Will the deer population survive while the hunters try to make up their minds? I hope that this ethnography may serve as a model of forming connections within our own close communities; that we may work towards preserving this interwoven web of culture through respect and interest in our environments. I haven't been hunting. I haven't yet sought out

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    Ethnography: Ainu

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    Ethnography: Ainu Worldview The Ainu, Japan’s native aboriginal people, are very much an isolated people, living now only in the northern island of Japan, Hokkaido. They number, as of a 1984 survey, 24,381, continuing a rise from a low point in the mid nineteenth century due to forced labor and disease, and have largely left their old ways and integrated into standard Japanese society, though even the majority of those still reside in Hokkaido. The animistic religion of the Ainu is firmly enmeshed

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