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    Eskimos in Alaskan Society The early Eskimos settled in the forest and tundra parts of northern and western Alaska. The Eskimos learned how to survive in this cod icy place that was frozen for most of the year. Some of the Eskimos lived in the southwestern part of Alaska The southwestern region is a little warmer and wetter. In Alaska there are three Eskimo groups they are yipik inupiat, and siberian yupik. A lot of the Eskimo families live in the flat tundra coast. The ocean gives them

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    Eskimo Pie Corporation

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    Eskimo Pie Corporation Introduction Reynolds Metals is the majority owner of the ice scream company Eskimo Pie Corporation and has decided to sell this company. Nestle Foods provided the highest offer of $61 Million. Due to delays of the Nestlé’s purchase, Reynolds Metals has take into consideration the IPO proposal of David Clark, president of Eskimo Pie Corporation, rather than selling the company to Nestle Foods (Case Study, 2001). This analysis will identify the current value of the

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    In Richard Nelson’s “Understanding Eskimo Science” a man, Nelson, traveled below the Arctic Circle in the boreal forest of interior Alaska were he lived, studied and interacted with a few native Eskimos groups during the mid-1960’s. Throughout the article Nelson provides an abundance of interesting and relevant information about Eskimo survival coming about through the understanding of one’s environment. Nelson’s best argument is the simple fact that these people have managed to survive in

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    Analysis of The Eskimo Girl Living in the Arctic wasn't easy. There were always problems, but this was different. Sophie had never been in such a desperate situation... She walked and looked around her. Sophie had lived in this part of the North Pole with her Inuit tribe for thirteen years. The Eskimos knew the land well. Sophie often explored the vast lakes and ancient mountains and had never got lost; but this time was different. She hadn't meant to walk far, but then she hadn't anticipated

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    Eskimos

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    We would like to talk about Eskimo. The word, Eskimo, was first created by Indians, which means the people who eat fresh meat. However, the most of Eskimos did not like this name, hence they changed the name to Inuit which means “true people” in Eskimo language. Distribution of Eskimos was extremely widespread in Arctic Indigenous Peoples. Eskimos moved to Canada (Greenland), United States (Alaska), Aleutian Island, Russia (Siberia). The number of population is about 90,000 people. Their religions

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    Arctic region

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    native Alaskan groups, and that still to this day continue practicing their subsistence lifestyle. Native Alaskan groups such as the Gwich'in Indians, Inupiat Eskimos, Yup'ik and Aleut still depend on the geographic features of the Arctic. For not only their subsistence lifestyle, but also the preservation of their culture. The word "Eskimo" means "those who eat their meat raw" in the Algonquian language; it also is another name for the Inuit. The word Inuit means "raw meat eaters". Which was actually

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    The Inuit People

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    The Inuit People The word Eskimo is not a proper Eskimo word. It means "eaters of raw meat" and was used by the Algonquin Indians of eastern Canada for their neighbours who wore animal-skin clothing and were ruthless hunters. The name became commonly employed by European explorers and now is generally used, even by them. Their own term for themselves is Inuit which means the "real people." The Inuit developed a way of life well-suited to their Arctic environment, based on fishing; hunting

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    Terror and Erebus

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    The play Terror and Erebus, written by Gwendolyn MacEwen, is about the tragedy of the Franklin expedition; an expedition to find the Northwest Passage in the 19th century. Franklin, the expedition leader, and the entire crew of both the Terror and the Erebus die on their journey to find the passage. The ships become stuck in the ice and the men are unable to handle the harsh winter conditions that are forced upon them. The men arrogantly thought they were prepared for their voyage because of their

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    Inuits of Greenland: An Adaptive Society

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    years. Today Greenland’s population is around 55,000, 85 percent of whom are Inuit (Caulfield:1997,1). The national language is Greenlandic, which is an branch of Inupik, or Eskimo language. There are three dialects according to the region in which they are spoken, such as West Greenlandic, East Greenlandic and Polar-Eskimo. Hunting, along with fishing is fundamental to their livelihood. Today, the Inuits are highly dependent on traditional methods of obtaining food through hunting and fishing

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    The Irish Countryman by Arensberg The Irish Countryman by Arensberg was a very interesting society in many aspects. Their way of life, their level of trust and respect, and their beliefs and priorities all make up the unique society that they all engage in. The Irish were very in touch with the spirit world both mentally and physically on a day to day basis. They continuously strived to please the fairies because they

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    The Inuit

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    The name Inuit means the real people. In 1977 the Inuit Circumpolar Conference officially adopted Inuit as the replacement for the term "Eskimo." There are several related linguistic groups of Arctic people. Many of these groups prefer to be called by their specific "tribal" names rather than as Inuits. In Alaska the term "Eskimo" is still commonly used. I. Physical Characteristics and Regional Groupings The Inuit vary within about 2 inches of an average height of 5 foot

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    Relationship between Cultural Change and the Environment The association between culture and human technologies is central to the issue of today’s worldwide environmental degradation. This relationship is often viewed as quite simple: as a culture develops, needs arise and are met by new technologies. The culture is then transformed by the effects the technologies have on the people’s way of life. It seems logical that new technology would only be developed as a result of incentive or passion

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    catcher in the rye

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    museum of natural history Holden uses exhibits to explain his resistance to change, “The best thing, though, in that museum was that everything always stayed right where it was. Nobody’d move. You could go there a hundred thousand times, and that Eskimo would still be just finished catching those two fish. Nobody’d be different. The only thing that would be different would be you (Salinger, 121).” Holden resists maturity and is a frightened teenager, he is frightened because he is guilty of the

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    Mock Documentaries

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    twentieth century documentary films used an element of fakery to add to the plausibility of the footage. War scenes were also depicted by cardboard cutouts of boats and often staged in backyard lagoons. In Robert Flaherty's 1922 film, Nanook of the North, Eskimo life was supposed to be shown as it existed without influence.... ... middle of paper ... ...ist, though the larger world that encompasses that specific world does exist and can be studied through the lens of the smaller, more specific world.

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    Agression

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    to such action." This definition basically explains that people have different reactions for different stimuli. Therefore, an individual is prone to act a certain way when he is stimulated to do so from his surrounding environment. For example, the Eskimo does not have an innate instinct that allows him to survive in his climate. He is taught to work with his people in order to survive when he is very young. When people are brought up in a society, they learn certain customs and traditions. These

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    Euthanasia

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    When an elderly Aymara Indian of Bolivia becomes terminally ill, relatives and friends are summoned to the home of the death vigil. The family will withhold food and drink until the dying person slips into unconsciousness and dies. In Eskimo cultures, an old or sick Eskimo tells his family when he is ready to die and the family will immediately comply by abandoning the aged person to the ravages of nature or by killing him themselves. Aged Ethiopians allowed themselves to be tied to wild bulls. The natives

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    Why would anyone pay for something they can get for free almost anywhere? Plumbing and free drinking water fountains are as old as Western Civilization. Selling water to a man with a faucet, or even a well, resembles the cliché of selling ice to an Eskimo. Consumers were intelligent enough to recognze that "evian," the name of the pioneering French drinking water bottler, was simply "naïve" spelled backwards. Yet by 1988 evian sold over 1 billion liters of water, all still bottled at the source in

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    The Mandan Indians

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    river for defense purposes, limiting attacks to one land approach. The Mandan lived in earth lodges, which are extremely large, round huts that are 15 feet high and 40-60 feet in diameter. Each hut had a vestibule entrance, much like the pattern of an Eskimo igloo, and a square hole on top, which served as a smokestack. Each earth lodge housed 10-30 people and their belongings, and villages contained 50-120 earth lodges. The frame of an earth lodge was made from tree trunks, which were covered with criss-crossed

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    God. Creator or Poet?

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    these tales again and again around the fires of the early tribes, by the hearth of humble cottages, before the great fire in the king's hall; they told them as they sat in the grass huts of the jungle, the Hogans of the Navajo, and the igloos of the Eskimo. Their children told them, and their children's children, until the stories were smooth and polished. And so people created their myths and their folktales, their legends and epics; the literature of the fireside, the poetry of the people, and the

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    My article review is on, “Stroke Mortality Among Alaska Native People”, by Ronnie Horner. The Alaskan Natives have been suffering with the vast number of mortality rates caused by strokes. This article was written to successfully understand the Alaskan’s stroke problem or factors that contribute to this problem, and eventually find strategies that will aid in its prevention. The only problem that exists with trying to come up with strategies for prevention is the sparseness of the epidemiological

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