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    Economic Consequences of Software Crime

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    Economic Consequences of Software Crime In 1996 worldwide illegal copying of domestic and international software cost $15.2 billion to the software industry, with a loss of $5.1 billion in the North America alone. Some sources put the total up-to-date losses, due to software crime, as high as $4.7 trillion. On the next page is a regional breakdown of software piracy losses for 1994. Estimates show that over 40 percent of North American software company revenues are generated overseas, yet nearly

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    Ecological Consequences of Global Economic Growth “There have been five ‘ mass extinctions’ in the history of the earth, when between 65% and 95% of all species were wiped out, due to natural processes of selection and evolution. Some scientists now argue that we are heading for a ‘sixth extinction’, caused by the actions of humans.” (Cock and Hopwood, 1996:17) In the following I’m going to look at the positive and negative effects of the ecological systems of global economic growth and

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    The Macro-Economic Consequences Of The Tsunami In South-Eastern Asia During the course of this essay I will illustrate the macro-economic consequences of the catastrophic tsunami that hit South-Eastern Asian coastlines in December 2004. The Indian Ocean earthquake was an undersea earthquake that occurred on December 26, 2004. The earthquake generated a tsunami that was among the deadliest disasters in modern history. At a magnitude of 9.0, it was the largest earthquake since 1964.

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    In the article “Successes and Failures of Neoliberalism” Evelyne Huber and Fred Solt describe economic, social and political consequences of the introduction of neoliberalism in Latin America in the 1980s and 1990s. To contrast the positive and negative impacts of neoliberalism Huber and Solt have taken into account five indicators: growth, economic stability and absence of volatility, poverty, inequality and quality of democracy (Huber and Solt 151). In a wide view of the regions' situation, growth

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    The Consequences of the Economic Development of Polar and Sub-Polar Regions Although indigenous populations established themselves centuries ago, polar and sub-polar regions of the Arctic and Antarctica have only fairly recently begun to develop. Originally classified as remote regions in the world, where the only activities, which took place, were small-scale fishing and hunting by locals in order to survive, they have become sources of great economic development and prosperity. Due to

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    Compare and Contrast Europe and Africa

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    weaknesses, and room for improvement. To this day both regions are far from perfect. Some light can be shed on this subject, by evaluating Europe and Africa’s state formation process, evaluating what party benefits, and briefly explaining two economic consequences of European colonialism in Africa. Problems began for Africa when there was the “scramble for Africa. Africa was extremely divided throughout the continent. There was no nation intact. Even though they were divided into colonies, they still

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    Cow disaster

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    OTTAWA (CP) - Canada's $8-billion mad cow disaster can be squarely attributed the failure of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency to assess economic consequences of even a single infection, says a leading expert. ADVERTISEMENT I'm a WomanMan seeking a ManWoman Age: to Postal Code: William Leiss of the University of Ottawa, who is also a past president of the Royal Society of Canada, said the CFIA assessed the risk of mad cow to animal health and human health, but not the risk of losing export

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    AIDS in Africa

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    percent of the world’s HIV infected population. The problem of this ongoing human tragedy is that Africa is also the least equipped region in the world to cope with all the challenges posed by the HIV virus. In order understand the social and economic consequences of the disease, it is important to study the relationship between poverty, the global response, and the effectiveness of AIDS prevention, both government and grass roots. Half of the world’s cases are found in what is referred to as the AIDS

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    Harnessing the Energy of the Oceans

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    The world’s energy consumption is currently doubling every 12 years and the consequences of our heavy dependence on fossil fuels are becoming increasingly apparent. Several studies have estimated that our "present reserves of oil and natural gas will be consumed within a few decades, and coal within a few centuries." In addition, "political instability in the Middle East has demonstrated the economic consequences of oil dependence" (Bregman, Knapp, and Takahashi; 1996). Environmental and political

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    Is the Common Agricultural Policy Prepared for the 2004 Enlargement? The voluntary cooperation among the European nations has survived numerous political and economic turbulences since its general inception after World War II. Fifty-five years ago, the Marshall Plan was proposed, leading to today’s European Union (EU) which seeks an “ever closer union among the European peoples.” The Enlargement of 2004 will integrate ten more European countries into the framework of the EU. As the number

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