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    Bataan Death March

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    The Bataan Death March started on April 11, 1942. It was a result of over 70,000 American and Filipino soldiers surrendering to the Japanese on April 9. The Japanese were surprised by this number, having only expected about 30,000. According to soldier Lester I. Tenney, who experienced the Death March first hand, it was brutal for the prisoners of war. “Japanese soldiers hollered and would prod us with their bayonets to walk faster(on a short walk to the starting point). Once at the main road, we

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    Bataan Death March

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    1. The Bataan Death March was a result of General Edward P. King's surrender. Furthermore, after spending 3 years as a POW in various Japanese prisons he was finally released, later he admitted that the surrender was completely a fault of his own. Additionally, King's surrender was a plight for survival he believed that surrendering was the wisest course of action. 2. After spending 3 years in prison General Edward P. King was released, regarded as a hero, and following the war served with the secretary

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    Bataan Death March

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    cruelty in our own American history. The Bataan Death March is one of these overshadowed events. The Bataan Death March began on April 15, 1942 after American forces surrendered at the Battle of Bataan on April 9, 1942 in the Philippines. Seventy-eight thousand American and Filipino soldiers were forced to evacuate Bataan to Camp O’Donnell, “a prison camp in central Luzon.” Of these 78,000 soldiers, 500 Americans and 10,000 Filipinos died on the march to the prison camp. (Falk 3) These soldiers were

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    Logan Chapin Mr. Gilbert United States History 2 May 2014 Bataan Death March The United States’ Armed Forces surrendered on April 9th, 1942 to Japanese General Masaharu Homma. Over 75,000 American and Filipino soldiers were forced to be Prisoners of War in which they marched to their death. This turning point in World War II happened at the Bataan Peninsula in the Philippines. This march was considered to be one of the worst outrages in wartime history. General Douglas MacArthur left the peninsula

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    The Bataan Death March was a brutal journey through torture and death, the captives were beaten, shot, beheaded, and were forced to walk 66 miles. The Bataan Death March, which was started on December 7, 1941, happened shortly after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. The Bataan Death March had been significant in many ways. The Bataan Death March started when nearly 70,000 Americans and Filipinos were captured and made Prisoners Of War by the Japanese. The prisoners were forced to march 55 miles, on the

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    Causes of the Bataan Death March On January 1942, the Japanese seized the peninsula of Bataan, cutting off American and Filipino soldiers, both under the command of the United States, from help and supplies. After ninety-nine days of fighting, more than 76,000 men surrendered and were forced to walk to Camp O’Donnell, a prison camp approximately sixty-six miles away.1 This was the first time in American history that an entire army had to surrender to an enemy.2 The Bataan Death March lasted from April

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    The Death March

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    the death march. These marches have often been criticized for being inhumane, and forcing enemy soldiers into “conditions primitive and unsanitary.” (51 Allen) Both of the death marches studied in this historical investigation occurred in World War II. The first is the Bataan Death March, inflicted upon Americans and Filipinos by the Japanese. The second case studied will be the forced movement of “undesirables” (i.e. Jews, Homosexuals, blacks, gypsies, etc.) in the numerous Nazi death marches

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    The 66-mile forced march was cruel and it ended the lives of many American soldiers. In the book Tears In The Darkness The Story Of The Bataan Death March And It’s Aftermath, by Michael Norman and Elizabeth M. Norman, it give readers insight on how the Japanese soldier’s fought the Americans during the battle of World War II. A boy named Ben Steele was a soldier in this war. He enlisted because he wanted to see the world, and throughout this book the author tells the story through his eyes. This

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    Unfortunately tyranny and oppression has many examples in history .One of the worst ones is the Nazis from the Second World War. The Nazi death camps and the stories told by eyewitnesses about the inhuman treatment of individuals are a reminder of those horrible days . We should tell the stories and listen to these eyewitnesses to make sure that history does not repeat itself. We also should speak out against Holocaust denials and against oppressive governments. The world population including Europeans

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    General Wainwright

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    knowing exactly why no was is. I had this same odd, tragic, and frustrating attraction to the Bataan Death March. The Death March was completely comprised of death and despair yet, the very inhumanity of it was seducing. Unfortunately for me, the Bataan Death March is not a person. Thankfully, General Jonathan Wainwright is. General Wainwright is the humanity masked by the mass cruelty of the Death March; the shining star overshadowed by the blackness and despair. He is the person that makes me stop

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