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    O’Leary James W. 1998. Irrigating Crops with Seawater. Scientific American. Irrigating Crops with Seawater'; talks about the global problem of finding enough water and land for the world’s population to survive. An estimated 494.2 million acres of cropland is needed just to feed the tropics and subtropics for the next 30 years. However, only close to 200 million acres are available. Therefore, new sources of water and land are needed to grow crops. The writers of this article have been

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    Barley: The Versatile Crop

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    Barley: The Versatile Crop Barley is a very important grain in the world today. It is very versatile in every way. It has been well adapted through its evolution. It has a very mysterious and much debated beginning. Now however, barely has become well known and so have its many uses. Barley, which is of the genus Hordeum, is a cereal that belongs to the grass family Poaceae. Barley has many different varieties. The most common is Hordeum vulgare, which is a six-rowed type of barley that has a

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    Crop Rotation and Soil Sustainability

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    Crop Rotation and Soil Sustainability Agriculture is responsible for providing food for an ever-growing population, and as it becomes clear that yields cannot continue to rise without limit, sustainability of agricultural practices becomes an increasingly important question. The soil is a precious resource in which all of agriculture has its base, and careful management of this complex system is essential. Crop rotation is one of the most important management practices in a sustainable agriculture

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    Genetically Modified Crops

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    Genetically Modified Crops Genetically modified crops (GM crops) climb to the top on the hotly debated issues list of society. In 1996, no GM crops were cultivated on a commercial scale in the United States. In 2002, 75% of soya, 71% of cotton, and 34% of all maize grown in America is GM ("Grim Reaper" 1). Many issues surround this controversial topic such as safety, ethics, and foreign relations. Many of these concerns are well stressed in mass media, but sometimes biased views are the

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    Proso Millet as an Alternative Crop

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    Proso Millet as an Alternative Crop Proso millet, Panicurn miliaceum (L.), is a warm season grass that is capable of producing seeds within a short growing season of 60 to 100 days (Boland, 2003). Proso millet possesses many unique characteristics that make it a promising alternative cash crop for the Great Plains region of United States. There is much potential for beneficial results if proso millet is further integrated into the cropping scheme of the Great Plains. Reasons for looking further

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    Genetically Engineered Crops

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    Genetically Engineered Crops Chemical and seed companies have been working the last several years to alter the genetic make-up of certain crops to combat heavy pressure from insects and weeds. Through genetic manipulation plant breeders have been able to make certain crops resistant to different types of chemicals and insects. Breeders can alter the crops by adding to a specific plant one or more genes from other related crops with a known resistance to an insect or herbicide The use of genetically

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    Weed Control Management in Crop Production

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    Weed Control Management in Crop Production Eons ago, our ancestors were a nomadic peoples that relied on their physical abilities as well as luck to survive. Our ancestors were a people that obtained their food through hunting and gathering. With the intelligence inherent of the human race, our ancestors soon realized that the hunting and gathering life style was not very reliable, nor did it allow much in the way of free time. The search began for an easier way to get food. Soon people realized

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    Nutsedge: Weedy Pest or Crop of the Future?

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    Nutsedge: Weedy Pest or Crop of the Future? Yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus L.) is an invasive weed in the United States. It is often regarded as a useless pest to home gardeners as well as commercial growers. Along with being a useless weed it is difficult to control. Several commercial herbicides have been labeled for use exclusively on yellow nutsedge and are available at local retailers. This, of course, indicates much research has gone into the development of chemicals to eradicate it

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    Crop Circles Essay

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    Crop circles are have been a mystery for a very long time and multiple movies and documentaries have been made by famous directors about this phenomenon. The most famous movie about this unique phenomenon starred Mel Gibson and was called Signs. Crop circles are designs that have been found in fields. A crop circle could be anything from a regular circle to a very challenging design called a pictogram. People believe that it could be anything from just pranks to aliens to a natural disaster. The

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    The Controversy of Genetically Modified Crops

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    Genetically Modified Crops You may know about the emerging field of biotechnology - the medicine, the ethics, the DNA, the Human Genome, etc.  But few realize the emergence of its agricultural branch, and the international conflict that has arisen from it.  It may apply to you more than you thought, for half of the soybean products and a quarter of the corn you ate in 1999 may have been genetically modified (Kaufman A6).  Genetically modified crops (commonly referred to as GMOs) are crops whose characteristics

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    Genetically Engineered Food Crops: Benefits Outweigh Risks Genetically engineered (GE) food crops have caused heated debate in the food industry for many decades and have caused many consumers major concern. According to Dr. Carroll Rawn, a biology professor at Seton Hall University, genetically engineering food entails taking genes from a certain crop and inserting those genes in the DNA of another. This process changes the nucleotide sequence of the crop and, therefore, its characteristics

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    Mysterious Crop Circles

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    explained. For the last few decades, crop circles have been appearing all around the world, yet we do not have a clear scientific explanation for them. Crop circles are defined as some kind of circular geometric patterns on crops such as wheat, barley, and corn, (Meder 2007). They are made within a very short period of time without any mistakes. There are over 12,000 circles found with complicated patterns and large in scale, (Crystalinks 2009) Many of the crop circles were found to be a manmade,

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    Crop Circles: Hoax or Truth?

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    Crop circles have been a mystery ever since they first appeared. In today’s world, people merely glance at an article about them. They simply brush it off to the side saying that “it has to be fake” or “it can’t be real”. Pat Delgado, a former NASA engineer, said, “It is perfectly natural to ask if crop circles are hoaxes, but very difficult to explain why they cannot be hoaxed satisfactorily” (Silva “Crop Circles”). Crop circles are very mysterious and interesting in many ways. A way this can be

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    1600’s, crop circles have fascinated millions. Originally from the town of Hertfordshire, UK, the first circle was claimed to be by the “Mowing-Devil”, as found in an English newspaper dated back to 1678. (Gail) The image in the center of the paper depicts a small, devilish creature with a scythe, mowing two rectangular, offset circles. Modern circles form themselves in anything that will take imprint, typically in fields of oats, barley, or corn. (Pringle 5) Since the 1600’s forward, crop circles

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    Sustainable crop production is a way of growing or raising food in an ecologically and ethically responsible manner. FThis includes adhering to agricultural and food production practices that do not harm the environment, that provide fair treatment to workers, and that support and sustain local communities. FSustainable crop production is in contrast to industrial crop production, G which generally relies upon monocropping (growing only one crop in a large area of land), intensive application

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    “Genetically Engineered Crops: Their Potential Use for Improvement of Human Nutrition” was written by Dr. Lin Yan and Dr. Philip S. Kerr. The focus of the article was to discuss research being done to help feed the increasing world population with new scientific discoveries that have been made since World War Two. The most monumental discoveries have been the discovery of “chemical processes to reduce nitrogen and ammonia” as well as fertilizers with nitrogen in them and chemical pesticides to control

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    developed countries are concerned about the adaptation of crops towards various abiotic stress conditions in food production industry. Considering the crop improvement and food production, they are highly influenced anticipated variations in temperatures and rainfall. This review deals with the following aspects of agricultural biotechnology: (1) the role of two key biotechnology approaches namely, molecular breeding and genetic engineering in crop development; (2) explains the integration of these two

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    billion the Latin American countries bring in each year from drug trafficking is quite unbalanced. While researchers agree drug crops create a source of income for a number of Latin American people, they disagree about whether or not economic aid from the United States can make a big enough difference to slow the drug flow into the country. 2. Some experts believe crop substitution is one way the economic aid money could be used to curb drug trafficking. Bruce Michael Bagley, from the Journal

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    prices of the crop are steady decreasing. How are farmers supposed to make a substantial income when the prices are overwhelming? Can the government not allow a set income for farmers each year, in addition to their profit? Twenty years ago when prices equaled each other. A farmer would purchase seed that was harvested from the year before, formerly known as “brown bag seed.” This seed usually ran for five dollars a bag. There are now ways of technology that help make a more productive crop. This makes

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    In 2001, genetically modified crops such as soybeans and corn could now be sprayed with glyphosate. The glyphosate alone reduces the weed pressure in the burn down in return helping increase the yield. The yield is increased because the crop is not fighting with the weeds for the water and nutrients. Another reason for its popularity is that it generally cost less than the herbicides would to replace it. Also crop producers can spray entire fields planted with genetically

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