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    John C Calhoun Analysis

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    April 2014 John C Calhoun As “The Champion of the South”, John C Calhoun often threatened the unity of the nation. John C Calhoun was a War hawk who had a desire to go to war with Great Britain. He developed the Nullification theory, a theory that changed Southern government. He defended the idea of slavery, calling it “a positive good”. His ideas and theories had a great impact on the South’s secession and also his desire to annex Texas led to a war with Mexico. John Caldwell Calhoun was born on March

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    John C. Calhoun: The Starter of the Civil War If one person could be called the instigator of the Civil War, it was John C. Calhoun -- Unknown. The fact that he never wanted the South to break away from the United States as it would a decade after his death, his words and life's work made him the father of secession. In a very real way, he started the American Civil War. Slavery was the foundation of the antebellum South. More than any other characteristic, it defined Southern social, political

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    Perhaps the three most influential men in the pre-Civil War era were Henry Clay, John C. Calhoun, and Daniel Webster. These men all died nearly a decade before the civil war began, but they didn’t know how much they would effect it. States’ rights was a very controversial issue, and one which had strong opposition and radical proposals coming from both sides. John C. Calhoun was in favor of giving states the power to nullify laws that they saw unconstitutional, and he presented this theory in his

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    Interestingly, the John C. Calhoun statue, from Charleston's Marion Square, connotes different ideologies to different individuals. Many have a skewed view of the statue, and more importantly, the man behind the monument. John C. Calhoun was and remains a controversial figure in the history of South Carolina. Calhoun is remembered by his political prowess and stature. His political career was one of power, sophistication, and seeming success. Unfortunately, many do not view Calhoun in this manner. Despite

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    America was freedom from a dominant and centralized federal government and towards what Turner termed “that restless, nervous energy; that dominant individualism” (Turner, 17). This definition is supported by writers like William Legget, and John C. Calhoun, who argued against the consolidation of broad political power in the hands of a few. However, that kind of freedom hinged on the opportunity for economic mobility for those seeking it,... ... middle of paper ... ...y which to govern it. The

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    preservation, improvement, and civilization of the native inhabitants” as in the First Annual Message to Congress of President James Monroe (Document I). As time goes by, the civilization of Indians by the US showed progress. In the letter John C. Calhoun written to Henry Clay in 1820, the Indian tribes “appear to be making gradual advances in industry and civilization…” and among them, “The Cherokees exhibit a more favorable appearance than any other tribes of Indians” (Document J). By 1825, the

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    tools available to protesting groups was literature. Some of the most famous protest literature in the world has its roots in American history. For example, some great American authors of protest literature include Thomas Paine, Thomas Nast, John C. Calhoun, and Martin Luther King. Through eloquent, sometimes subtle means, these authors became the spokesmen for their particular protest movements. Thomas Paine was an English-born man who seemed to stir controversy wherever he traveled. Paine's forceful

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    from the South is so intent on making slaves legal in the territories that he is willing to break with the North over it. He also says that California and New Mexico were “purchased by the common blood of the people”(A). This was the view of John C. Calhoun that people from every state fought to gain these territories so everyone should have equal access to them. It was not only the people of the South that were taking on these feelings of hatred toward the North, but the government also. The South

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    Daniel Webster

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    roads in the West. In 1828, the dominant economic interests of Massachusetts having shifted from shipping to manufacturing, Webster backed the high-tariff bill of that year. Angry Southern leaders condemned the tariff, and South Carolina's John C. CALHOUN argued that his state had the right to nullify the law. Replying to South Carolina's Robert HAYNE in a Senate debate in 1830, Webster triumphantly defended the Union. His words "Liberty and Union, now and forever, one and inseparable!" won wide

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    The Political Career of Daniel Webster Daniel Webster contributed a large potion of the Civil War. To begin, he was born in Salisbury, New Hampshire on January 18, 1782. His parents were farmers so many people didn't know what to expect of him. Even though his parents were farmers, he still graduated from Dartmouth College in 1801. After he learned to be a lawyer, Daniel Webster opened a legal practice in Portsmouth, New Hampshire in 1807. Webster quickly became an experienced and

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