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    British Troops in Northern Ireland in 1969 In August of 1969 British Troops were sent to Northern Irelandunder the order of Harold Wilson, the British Prime Minister. This action was due, to growing tensions between the Catholic and Protestant communities all over Ireland since the turn of the 20th Century. There had always been long term problems between the Catholics and Protestants of Northern Ireland which are rooted deep in the histories of England and Ireland. There were also many

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    The Conditions Faced by the British Troops on the Western Front The conditions faced by the British troops on the Western Front were terrible due to the shallow poorly built trenches that accompanied awful living space, food that was rationed out in small quantities and mind altering experiences. It was horrific and was the definition of the First World War. However, these conditions were varied in their brutal existence. Different regiments and people of different military status suffered

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    British Government's Sending of Troops into Northern Ireland in 1969 The troubles in Ireland go as far back as 1169 when the British first went over there under the command of Henry II. Henry II got permission from the Pope to invade Ireland because he believed that Ireland was developing its own form of Roman Catholicism. Since then British people have been living in Ireland, and this has caused conflict between the British and the Irish because the Irish Catholics didn’t like living under

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    Why the British Troops Were Sent into Northern Ireland in 1969 In 1969 British Troops were sent into Ireland because Irish police could no longer cope with the violence between the Unionist Protestant population and the Catholic Nationist population. The events that meant it was necessary for British troops to be sent in stretch back a long way. This essay presents the main long term and short term explanations as to why troops were needed. The tensions between Catholic and Protestant

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    Exploring Why the British Troops Were Sent into Northern Ireland in 1969 Ireland was once a Nation they claimed a moral right to live in Ireland. Before 1500 the Gaelic lived in Ireland, they shared a language and political structure. They were separated into smaller groups. In the 5th century the Gaelic were converted to Christianity by missionaries. After 1500 the English took control for the first time by way of force due to the Irish being loyal to Catholicism and the English were

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    Look at Why British troops were Sent into Northern Ireland in 1969 On the 14th August 1969 the British army was sent into occupy Northern Ireland. The aim of this essay is to explain the short, medium and long term causes of why the British troops were deployed in Northern Ireland. i am going to do this by looking at sources, events and evidence. The clashes between the Catholics and Protestants in NI go back a long way from the middle ages. Between 1500 and 1800 when the British tried to

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    Bush, Blair and Iraq

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    On April 9, 2003 United States tanks stormed through Baghdad, Iraq. U.S. troops, then, toppled a giant statue of Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein in central Baghdad, which sent the Iraqi citizens into jubilee (Rampton 1). The Iraq War, or government's coined 'Operation Iraqi Freedom,' had finally arrived after declaring war on March 19, 2003. The U.S.-British coalition to invade Iraq and dethrone Hussein's dictatorship has been both a beneficial and detrimental political move. A war that originated

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    Imagine you are an American Colonists just making ends meet as a merchant. There has recently been a war between the French and the British. During the war, you continued to trade with the enemy and smuggle goods, while your colonial assembly repeatedly refused to provide military officials with men and supplies. The war eventually ends, leaving the British with debt and expensive responsibilities to administer newly acquired territory in North America, they received from the French. Believing

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    Declaring Independence

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    major battle fought in the war. The colonists had made a fort on Bunker and Breeds Hills to fire on English ships approaching Boston. Thomas Gage ordered his British troops to attack the hills. He believed the task to be an easy one, but met great resistance. It took two British attempts to capture the two hills, which lead to many British casualties. The second attempt did run the colonists off the hills, but resulted in a greater colonial victory. Of the original 2500 Redcoats, only 1500 had survived

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    was passed as a means to pay for British troops on the American frontier. The colonists were the ones paying for the troops and they violently protested the Act. 1766- The Stamp Act is repealed. 1768- British troops arrive in Boston to enforce laws. 1770- Four workers are shot by British troops stationed in Boston. The American Patriots labeled the killings “The Boston Massacre.” 1773- Massachusetts patriots dressed as Mohawk Indians protest the British Tea Act by dumping crates of tea

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    Steps To The Revolution Starting At 1763 -1775 One of the most significant events in American History was the Revolution. Prior to 1763, which was the beginning to the road to the Revolution, America and Britain were on good terms. The British helped America to try and defeat the Indians for the Ohio Valley. One year after the British's "efforts" to help America get the Ohio Valley, something happens... The Prime Minister George Grenville, creates the Sugar Act of 1764. This act, in short

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    Why Ireland is not Free

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    deserve. This has all been going on because Britain was given Irelands land back in the 12th Century. Ireland has been struggling for freedom throughout history. Britain will not leave the nation of Ireland until it gets back what remains of British economical investments in the northeast of Ireland (Metress 149). Ireland had always been ruled by Britain but it wasn’t until Ireland voted to be a free nation, they were denied, and they started to fight back on Easter in 1916. According to Golway

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    Andrew Jackson

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    of John Adams or Thomas Jefferson, be, in the many historians minds, greater than Adams or Jefferson? The long answer to that question will start when "Andy" as the young, and slim Jackson is called, attains to the age of 13. The year was 1780, British troops had taken South Carolina, Andy's oldest brother had joined the American regiment fighting in their home town, but died due to heat exhaustion in battle. At the sight of his deceased brother Hugh, Jackson joins the army as a mounted messenger.

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    the seven years war

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    France and Great Britain. In 1754, in North America, George Washington was defeated at Fort Necessity in western Pennsylvania. From that moment on, both France and Great Britain dispatched troops, although not in equal numbers. For France, the war in Europe was the top priority, so the country sent just a few troops. It also considered it was more important to protect its colonies in the West Indies, since sugar cane was more lucrative than the fur trade in New France (Canada). Great Britain on the

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    Boston Massacre

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    For a few months prior to the massacre, British troops had been stationed in Boston. The soldiers were in Boston to help with the collection of money to pay for duties on imported goods (Hansen 11). Tensions were high between the townspeople and the soldiers. Colonists greatly resented the soldiers because they believed that there should not be military personnel amongst them. The Bostonians took out their anger on the soldiers. In turn, the British troops were extremely unfriendly towards the people

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    destructive nature of battle while remaining inspiring and even optimistic. Tennyson’s "The Charge of the Light Brigade" reveals a fatal "blunder" that cost the lives of many English soldiers, while asserting that the unquestioning loyalty of the British troops causes tremendous pride. Whitman’s Drum-Taps series of poems, especially "Beat! Beat! Drums!," documents the tragedies that occurred during the Civil War, yet maintains a feeling of hope that the war will help to cleanse the nation and revitalize

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    Andrew Jackson

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    didn’t go to school for much of his life. At the young age of nine years old he read the Declaration of Independence at a gathering of thirty to forty people. When Andrew Jackson was 14 he fought in the revolutionary war against the British with his fellow patriots. The British captured him and the officer demanded that Andrew clean his boots and when Andrew refused the officer struck him with his sword that left a scar on his head for the remainder of his life. Soon after he was released from prison his

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    Napoleon Bonaparte

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    lieutenant of artillery on January 1786, at the age of 16. Napoleon was appointed as artillery commander in the French forces, which had risen in revolt against the republican government and was occupied by British troops. He made a successful plan: he placed guns at Point 'Eguillete, threatening the British ships in the harbor, forcing them to retreat. A successful assault, but Bonaparte was wounded in the thigh during it, led to the capture of the city again and a promotion to brigadier-general for Napoleon

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    Andrew Jackson

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    sister’s home in South Carolina. The revolutionary war was very hard on the Jackson family. All three boys saw active service in the war. One brother, Hugh, died during a battle. Andy and his other brother Robert were taken as prisoners of war. A British officer told them to shine his shoes and when Andrew said no, the officer sliced his hand. Andrew took this resentment to his grave. Robert contracted smallpox and died. Andrew’s mother also died of an illness. Andrew was left as an orphan living

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    Constantine the Great, was the first Roman emperor to adopt Christianity. He was educated in the imperial court of Rome and pursued to succeed his father. In 305 A.D., his father became the emperor of the Western Empire. But, when he died in 306 A.D., British troops declared that Constantine should replace his father. The Eastern emperor Galerius refused this claim and gave Constantine a lesser rank. The Emperor Constantine I was the sole ruler of the Roman world between 324 and 337 A.D. His reign was

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