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    Auditory Localization

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    Auditory Localization Auditory localization is the ability to recognize the location from which a sound is emanating (Goldstine, 2002). There are many practical reasons for studying auditory localization. For example, previous research states that visual cues are necessary in locating a particular sound (Culling, 2000). However, blind people do not have the luxury of sight to help them locate a sound. Therefore, the ability to locate sound based only on auditory ability is important. It is also

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    Auditory Sensations

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    to communicate, learn, and stay aware of our environment. In fact, hearing is the only sense that never stops receiving sensory input. While all of our other senses become drastically less sensitive when we are sleeping, our brain still processes auditory information to awaken us the second something is wrong. Although this may have been more practically used before people slept safely in homes, it’s still useful for hearing a fire alarm or our alarm clock in the morning. We are able to hear by processing

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    Auditory Processing

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    Language and Learning Problem—Introduction Auditory processing is the process of taking in sound through the ear and having it travel to the language portion of the brain to be interpreted. In simpler terms, “What the brain does with what the ear hears”(Katz and Wilde, 1994). Problems with auditory processing can affect a student’s ability to develop language skills and communicate effectively. “If the sounds of speech are not delivered to the language system accurately and quickly, then surely the

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    Students With Auditory Challenges and Mainstream Schools Hearing-impaired and deaf students can better succeed in life when educated in mainstream schools than being segregated in special schools because though they have special needs, they learn to communicate better with hearing individuals and can still attend special programs where teachers with special training can help them in their educational journey. Heather Whitestone, a deaf ballet dancer from Alabama, became the first Miss America

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    diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) also have diagnosed with auditory sensitivity. According to the article “Pathways: Audiology Must Take its Rightful Place on the Autism Team” on the Hearing Journal by Carol A. Lau, a dual-qualified audiologist and speech-language pathologist, and has been practicing for more than 20 years, she has witnessed a strong connection between ASD and Auditory Processing Disorder, a form of auditory processing issue. She states “In my clinical practice, we have assessed

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    Auditory Deprivation

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    Abstract: The objective of this study was conducted in order to see if deaf individuals display both better and worse visual skills than having the ability to perceive sounds. Also, to determine if it is possible that early auditory deprivation would cause vision to enhance. The data for this study was collected and analyzed in this way by using bulk of literature on deafness reports; describing the deficiencies in deaf individuals. The subjects undergo three different studies: selective effects

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    nerves transfer the coded activity to the central nervous system, while the thalamus processes and then relays the neural responses. Lastly, the cerebral cortex receives input and produces the sensation and perception from the brain. Energy in the auditory system contains information about the world. This energy has a stimulus which comes from sound waves like ripples on a pond. The type of energy that this is, is mechanical energy. The vibrations cause changes in pressure of the medium and speed is

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    Auditory Pareidolia is the topic of my project. Can the mind trick itself into "hearing" familiar or expected noises? My hypothesis is that the the test subjects will "hear" the song in their minds, even after it is blocked out physically, because of Auditory Pareidolia. I plan to test this by having five test subjects listen to a familiar song one at a time while white noise is added to the song. The test subjects will hold heir thumbs up when they hear the song, and down when they don't. When the

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    Auditory Brainstem Response, commonly abbreviated as ABR is a test used to determine the thresholds of hearing and evaluate the pathways of the auditory system in the brainstem linked to disorders. The test is categorised as an objective test as it measures the waveforms produced in response to a stimulus and doesn’t rely on the patient to cooperate. (Iwona Kostorz, 2013). ABR is essentially used for neonatal screening, threshold estimation, intraoperative monitoring and determining the type of hearing

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    Music Appreciation and the Auditory System

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    Music Appreciation and the Auditory System Have you ever come home after an exhausting day and turned on music to relax your nerves? While you are taking it easy, your auditory cortex is not. It works hard to synthesize the several musical elements of rhythm, pitch, frequency, and timbre to create a rich auditory experience. First, a discussion of the ear physiology is needed. Vibrating air moving at different frequencies hits the eardrum which causes the middle ear's three bones to move

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