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    Asian Americans have been more active and involved in politics over the past decade. Furthermore, Asian Americans increasingly became more visible in politics extending beyond the city limits. While in many major cities such as Seattle, Los Angeles, San Francisco, and New York City remain packed and serve as a gateway for Asian Americans immigrants. A majority of the United States Asian American population has now moved into the Suburbs. This serves as a part of reaching the American “Dream”. The

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    increases the diversity. Asians are a significant part of U.S. culture as they have been around for years. However when compared to how other U.S. citizens are treated, Asian Americans are treated significantly worse. “Asian Americans, like other people of color, continually find themselves set apart, excluded and stigmatized-whether during the 19th century anti-Chinese campaign in California, after the 1922 Supreme Court decision (Ozawa v. United States) that declared Asians ineligible for U.S. citizenship

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    Asian American Culture

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    People form East Asian immigrate to the Unite States, which is an ethnic cultural crucible, that only is a small ethnic group. However, they have been considered to be different from other minority ethnic groups because of their high school achievement. According to Huang, Asians get higher score than whites get at schools, especially in mathematics, science and other technical areas(cited from Pang, Han,& Pang,2011; Peng& Wright,1994). As immigrants, Asian American are not only adjusting themselves

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    Asian American, Who Left Out from the debate What will be your first thought when you hear the word “undocumented”? Immigration issue, especially undocumented immigration issue is always framed as Latino issue. On the contrary, Asian immigrants are often left out of this discussion. As the matter of fact, Asia is now the largest sending region for immigrants. Asian Americans are the fastest-growing immigrant population in the United States today. They are expected to become the largest immigrant

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    The Asian American Dream

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    Did you know that the Asian American race has the highest minority rate worldwide? Asian Americans take up only 5.8 percent of the United States population. They have had a hard time here in the United States trying to achieve and live the “American Dream” but they have had many things get in the way of that. Things that get in their way are factors like Worldwide discrimination. No matter where they go, they get discriminated from things just because they are Asian American. Another thing is their

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    Asian American Identity

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    Silence as Beauty, Silence as Self: The Asian American Identity The label “American” encompasses many different cultures and races. However, American society is often guilty of assuming there is only one true, certainly white, “American” face, voice, and behavior. Associate Professor of Sociology, Minako Maykovich, states that “the criteria for physical characteristics are generally determined by the dominant group in society,” thus “racial difference is the greatest obstacle to the process

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    Asian-American Stereotypes

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    football during my first year of high school. These discriminatory statements towards the few Asians and me on the team were things we heard daily from other teammates and students. While these stereotypes of Asians only being good for studying and playing badminton or volleyball was prevalent in my school, that didn’t stop me from trying to be the best football player on the team and disproving the typical Asian student at my high school. As with the up and coming star Jeremy Lin, he too had to face

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    For my experiment, I decied to interview and observe how Asain people reacts to certain question or incidient. Chicago is the best state to observe how Asian culture affects people. There were many Asian social groups that I was able to choose to attend. For my observation, I chose my former church where I used to attend during middle school to monitor gender roles. The weekend I visited the church was a perfect timing, since it was the day we were to celebrate 15th anniversary-establishment of

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    Since the first influx of Asian immigrants to the United States, Asian Americans were never treated as an integral part of the American population. Accounting for five percent of the US demographic, often times, they are still portrayed by provincial people as outsiders who do not belong in society. Over the years, this negative mentality has transformed into the way Asian Americans are viewed in media. Though there are many attempts of reversing the trend such as diversifying the cast members,

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    rates of natives, settlers and immigrants, the ‘white’ American culture has taken on the hues of a rainbow. Within this society, the Asian-Americans, are often perceived to be at the highest stratum due to high income and good education. These people have almost successfully integrated themselves into society thus resulting in a blurring of lines. This essay would help to demonstrate the similarities between the Asian-Americans and Americans in religion, education and power while also exploring their

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    many stereotypes and misconception for one specific ethnic group: Asian. But perhaps the most popular image of Asian Americans presented in society is being the “model minority.” If you were to ask any random person to pick a specific minority group that was more academically, economically and socially successful compared to the others, chances are 90% of them would answer: Asians. “Asians makes more money than any other race.” “Asians have the highest grades compared to other races, especially in math

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    Asian-American´s Suicide

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    According to research, California State Fullerton professor Eliza Noh states that Asian-American women of the age 15 to 24 have the highest rates of suicide than any other racial, ethnic, or gender group. The “model minority” pressure—“socially produced pressure internalized by families of some Asian-American children to be high achievers at school and professionally”—plays a large factor to the issue, especially since girls, who are more affected by it than boys, are expected to become the “perfect

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    In this paper I will be sharing information I had gathered involving two students that were interviewed regarding education and their racial status of being an Asian-American. I will examine these subjects’ experiences as an Asian-American through the education they had experienced throughout their entire lives. I will also be relating and analyzing their experiences through the various concepts we had learned and discussed in class so far. Both of these individuals have experiences regarding their

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    Asian Americans as Model Minorities

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    Asian Americans as Model Minorities For 20 years, Asian Americans have been portrayed by the press and the media as a successful minority. Asian Americans are believed to benefit from astounding achievements in education, rising occupational statuses, increasing income, and are problem-fee in mental health and crime. The idea of Asian Americans as a model minority has become the central theme in media portrayal of Asian Americans since the middle 1960s. The term model minority is given to a minority

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    issues that arise in first generation Asian-American children through living in a bicultural environment. The articles vary in different aspects of mental health among Asian-American children. The paper starts with stressors that may cause mental disorders in Asian-American children and leads into detail with factors that play a huge part in their lives and allows for conflicts between the two societies they live through on a daily basis. It leads into Asian American usage of mental health services and

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    The number of Asian American communities is growing in the U.S. population, however, these groups of people are often marginalized and misrepresented in mainstream media. In today’s mainstream media, there is a visible lack of Asian American representation on film. Asian actors, when given roles in film and television, are rarely cast for central roles and form about only 3% of prime-time characters (Ramasubramanian, 2011). Not only is the number for casting Asian and Asian Americans low, the roles

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    As an Asian American, I have several points to discuss in terms of stereotypes. Through a variety of media, Asian Americans are portrayed by socially constructed stereotypes that are either positive or negative to our community. By explaining the definition of a stereotype and listing three specific ones identified, these points reflect our cultural values. These stereotypes include the concept of model minority, the insinuation that Asians are highly skilled at mathematics, and assumptions of our

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    Asian Americans: Exclusion and Segregation

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    The United States of America is the place of opportunity and fortune. “Many immigrants hoped to achieve this in the United States and similar to other immigrants many people from the Asian Pacific region hoped to make their fortune. They planned to either return to their homelands or build a home in their new country (Spring, 2013).” For this reason, life became very complicated for these people. They faced many challenges in this new country, such as: classifying them in terms of race and ethnicity

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    Suffering through countless educational inequalities, the Asian American community aims to change the way education works. The reasons why Asian Americans are activists in education is because they want to be treated more equally in the field of education. As mentioned in lecture, students are demanding a change in the curriculum from the change of the Eurocentric history as they demand ethnic studies. They would usually demand this right through peaceful protesting met with violent responses as

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    Diabetes in Asian American Adolescents

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    factors such as family history, obesity, and ethnicity are all crucial to the prevalence of diabetes and its devastating effects on the future health of those affected. Asian-American ethnicity is associated within the high risk factors along with several other ethnicities such as African Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Native Americans (Smeltzer, Bare, Hinkle, & Cheever, 2010, p. 1197). The following will establish how diabetes in adolescents has become a critical topic for their generation and the

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