Free Arab Women Essays and Papers

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Free Arab Women Essays and Papers

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    Arab Women and Their Spouses In many societies, the relationships between people differ and in some ways are all alike. None so obscure as the relationship between man and woman. It is especially intriguing to witness the compatibility of both especially in marriage. Using the three novels Pillars of Salt, by Fadia Faqir, A Woman of Five Seasons, by Leila Al-Atrash, and A Balcony over the Fakihani, by Liyana Badr one might begin to analyze the different relationships between men and women in Arab

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    arab women

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    For many generations, women vowed to give their all, and instead of receiving the equal treatment of love and appreciation, they were oppressed and degraded. In Egypt, a woman did not have the right to divorce herself; therefore, she had to put up with all the humiliation, mistreatment, unfairness, and inequality everyday. Today, women are celebrating the new law of “Khul’”, which gives the woman the right to divorce herself with or without her oppressor’s consent, but the question is: does the woman

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    Arab Women and Education

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    Arab Women and Education Whether it was the impoverished desert village, the war torn hills of Beirut, affluent Barqais, the jet set in London and Paris, or the enclosed lives of women in a harem in Morocco, the female characters in these novels all shared five common threads that dealt with the family and the search for identity. In my reading of five novels about Arab women from backgrounds and in situations as diverse as I thought possible, I was surprised to find this common thread running

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    Exploring Arab Women

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    Exploring Arab Women In Liyana Badr’s novel, A Balcony over the Fakihani, the reader witnesses Yusra’s experience with water as she proclaims that, “I’ll [she’ll] stay till I’ve [she’s] filled my [her] jerry can [even] if I [she] die[s] doing it! (Badr, 10)” While Maha the main female character in Fadia Faqir’s Pillars of Salt, and her husband “immersed our [their] bodies in the warm water,” (Faqir, 54) of the Dead Sea as they share their first love making experience. Yasmina teaches granddaughter

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    Alienation in the lives of Arab Women

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    Alienation in the lives of Arab Women Alienation: al·ien·a·tion ( l y -n sh n, l - -) n. The act of alienating or the condition of being alienated; estrangement; isolation or dissociation. Alienation is a concept that is universal to all people of all cultures in the world and throughout all time periods. These feelings of alienation, in some form or another, have affected every human begin that has ever taken a breath and will until the race is extinct. It is these feelings of alienation

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    The Community of Female Voices in Arab Women Literature In her memoir, Dreams of Trespass, Fatima Mernissi remembers asking her grandmother Yasmina how one can discern a true story from a false one. The wise old woman, Yasmina, told her granddaughter to relax and not look at life in extreme polarities because "there are things which could be both [true and false] and things which could be neither" (Dreams, 61). "Words are like onions," Yasmina explained further and "the more skins you peel off

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    think about getting outside of the house in fear of the males who have power over them. Many of those countries, where women still have no power, are in the Middle East and most of them are part of the Arab League. The Arab League, or League of Arab states, is composed of of 22 Arab states. Morocco, Libya, Oman, Qatar, Egypt, and Jordan are a few states that are known as part of the Arab League. (The Editors, 2013) Recently, many laws have slowly been in the process of began changing for the females

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    by the West has been Arab women’s apparent lack of power. With the 2011 Arab uprisings, a different type of image arose for a while. This image publicized an active Arab woman, who was at the forefront of a non-violent protest movement, politically active and fighting for democracy. Women came out in large numbers; thousands joining male protesters in squares in Egypt, Tunisia, Libya, Syria, Bahrain and Yemen. This participation gave a sense of equity as both men and women stood side by side fighting

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    Ages and the Modern Era. This bridge contributed to the prosperity and the development of Europe. Unfortunately, the Arab world is still lagging far behind. This gap can’t be filled unless an Arab human renaissance occurs. And this rebirth can’t be successful unless the status of women in the Arab world is improved. In fact, I believe that the rise of women is a prerequisite for an Arab renaissance. This transformation must be based on a peaceful process of negotiation for redistributing power and building

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    Arab Women

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    desperate poverty make Afghanistan the world’s most dangerous country in which to be born a woman” (Lisa Anderson). Khaled Hosseini’s A Thousand Splendid Suns is both an epic and horrendous account of two young Afghan women, Mariam and Laila. Blinded by the atrocious tragedies practiced on women in Afghanistan, Nana instructs her daughter, Mariam, that there is “only one skill a woman like you and me needs in life… And it’s this: tahamul. Endure” (Hosseini 17). What’s more, the reader sympathizes with the

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