Free Antonin Artaud Essays and Papers

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    Bertolt Brecht, LeRoi Jones and Antonin Artaud In LeRoi Jones's play, "Dutchman," elements of realism, naturalism and non-realism abound. The play features characters such as Clay, a twenty-year-old Negro, Lula, a thirty-year-old white woman, both white and black passengers on a subway coach, a young Negro and a conductor. All of these characters take a ride that, for each, ends with different destinations and leaves the audience to sort through the details and find conclusions themselves

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    The Use of the Body in Artaud's Theatre

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    The aim of this paper is to explore Antonin Artaud's use of the body in performance, as the "site of all human transformation, liberation and independence" (Barber, p72). Artaud's immense influence on theatre practice continues to generate interest and debate. Calling for an end to rational drama, his iconoclastic work pushes the boundaries of critical thinking by means of a continuous flow of construction and destruction. In Antonin Artaud: Man of Vision, Bettina Knapp offered an explanation of

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    Opposing Traditional Theatre Norms

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    been partial to this conventional form of theatre. Antonin Artaud, in particular, loathed the theatre, and wanted to reform the way society experienced it. In this paper, I will examine Artaud’s role as a major contributor to modern theatre in his attempt to rid performance of its fake realism, as well as the bourgeoisie neoclassical ideals. Typically, when one imagines theatre, he often envisions a stage, with three walls, and an audience. Artaud was concerned with this view, and recognized a necessity

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    Gao Xianjing

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    Before speaking further about culture, I must remark that the world is hungry and not concerned with culture, and that the attempt to orient toward culture thoughts turned only toward hunger is a purely artificial expedient. – Antonin Artaud, The Theater and Its Double, Introduction. To say that the theater of the 1950s was dominated by two dramaturgical theories is a gross simplification, a thoroughly Western perspective that ignores numerous non-European art forms for the sake of simplifying theatrical

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    is a concept that has influenced many practitioners including pioneering practitioner Antonin Artaud. Artaud played a huge role in forwarding this concept of a Total Theatre within his own genre of performance, described as “one of the great, daring mapmakers” (Artaud, 1976, p.Ivii), he like Newson saw faults with the theatre of his time and realised his own genre of performance, the Theatre of Cruelty. Artaud was disgusted by the bourgeois culture of western theatre, a theatre which showed plays

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    Progress and Necessity

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    Progress and Necessity That theater has undergone many changes since its early incarnation in ancient Greece is a fact obvious even to the casual observer. And it is likewise clear that, as the cultural and social structure of the world shifts and changes over time, it is appropriate that its art forms change as well, in order to address appropriately the new reality in which they exist. However, perhaps not too unexpectedly, there are those who reject our modern manifestation of theater as insincere

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    Dvorak

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    Dvorak Antonin Dvorak was born in Nelahozeves on September 8, 1841. Dvorak was one of the greatest of the Czech composers. He grew up with an appreciation of local folk songs and demonstrated a talent for music at an early age. His first experience with music was of a violinist and violist. He got the attention of Johannes Brahms with his Moravian Duets and soon won a competition in Vienna that he would have never won if it had not been for the insistence of Brahms. Since his patriotic composition

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    Antonin Scalia

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    Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia was born on March 11, 1936 in Trenton, New Jersey to a Sicilian immigrant father and an Italian-American mother and was raised in Queens. He attended Catholic schools in New York City as a child and teen. Scalia then attended Georgetown University, spending his junior year at the University of Fribourg in Switzerland, and graduated at the top of his class with an A.B. (Sorry, I don’t know what that means) in 1957. He also attended Harvard, serving as the editor

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    dozen of the justices' most interesting and controversial opinions. This book would not have been written if it were not for such an interesting character to talk about. Before, I talk about the book itself I would like to "get to know" Antonin Scalia. Antonin Scalia was born March 11, 1936, in Trenton, New Jersey to S. Eugene Scalia and Catherine Scalia. Scalia attended St. Francis Xavier, a military prep school in Manhattan and graduated first in his class. Later, her received his A.B. summa

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    Interpretation of the U.S. Constitution

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    time in American history and is the framework for our government systems. There are different ways to view this document and different ways to interpret it, which can cause debate over the proper and correct way to go about interpretation. Justice Antonin Scalia and former Justice William Brennan, are two intellectuals with different methods and ideas about the correct way to interpret and enforce the Constitution. To understand how the Constitution works for the people of America, one must first

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