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Free Andersonville Essays and Papers

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    History of Andersonville Prison

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    History of Andersonville Prison When one turns on the television today they are made witness to all the crimes that are present in society. It is impossible to sit through thirty-five minutes of news without anger and rage becoming aroused. This is because society is bothered by infinitesimal paraphernalia. Society also believes in human rights and punishment for those who violate such rights. Yet what constitutes humanity? Ever sit there and watch the news and wonder just how far humanity reaches

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    The Andersonville Trial

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    but also the defense of Wirz’s attorney, Baker, the testimony of the defendant, Henry Wirz, shows that Wirz should not have been found guilty. Henry Wirz ran Andersonville, one of the many Confederate prison camps, which was located in Georgia. Andersonville opened in February of 1864 and closed down in May 1865. Significantly, Andersonville was not the only prison of war camp. The Union also had a prisoner of war camp located in New York, Elmira, which was also, in fact, very horrid. There were

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    Andersonville Prison

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    Andersonville, officially named Camp Sumter, was the most infamous Confederate prison during the Civil War (Davis 350; Reeder 140). The camp first opened in February 1864 close to the village of Andersonville in Sumter County, Georgia. Due to a food shortage at the compound in Richmond, Virginia, caused by an overflow of war prisoners, the Confederate officials decided to build a new prison in southwest Georgia (Turner 161, 162). The first prisoners arrived to an open expansion of sixteen acres,

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    Andersonville Prison

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    Andersonville Prison I was excited to learn of this assignment because I recently made a trip to Andersonville with my Army unit in March. During the bus ride, we watched the film “Andersonville” to gain a deeper sense of what the historical site was about before we arrived. To be quite honest, the historical site itself is actually quite boring and not much is left of the original grounds. Watching the film prior to arriving gave the visit much more meaning to me and I was able to actually

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    Andersonville (the Movie) “Five hundred men moved silently toward the gates that would shut out life and hope for most of them forever. Quarter of a mile from the railroad we came into a massive palisade with great squared logs standing upright in the ground. Fires blazed up and showed us a section of these and two massive wooden gates with heavy iron hinges and bolts. They swung open as we stood there and we passed through into the space beyond. We were at Andersonville.” – Private John McElroy

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    Andersonville prison is in Macon County in the southwestern part of Georgia. It was originally constructed as a prison camp for the Union soldiers, it was the equivalent of the concentration camps of World War Two, and it was a significant location in the Civil War, America’s bloodiest war. What took place there is gut wrenching. You will have to read on to find out just how appalling life was in the prison. Andersonville Prison has not always been know as Andersonville Prison. When it was being

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    the 135th year since the statue had reached the shores of America (Hackmann 1). As the result of a promise, the replica of Our Lady found its new home in southern Indiana. Following their capture and shipment to the horrid Civil War prison at Andersonville, four young men—Isidore Naviaux, Henry Devillez, Lambert Rogier, and Xavier Rogier—endured appalling conditions and made an oath to pay tribute to Our Lady of Consolation if one survived. Naviaux, along with the others, did not know what he signed

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    The Infamous Civil War Prison Andersonville The Confederacy established Andersonville, that most infamous of Civil War prisons, in late February, 1864. It built a stockade in west central Georgia to accommodate approximately 10,000 prisoners of war. As the fighting moved ever deeper into the South in the last year of the war, the expanded stockade at one point held nearly 33,000 Union soldiers. The termination by the North of the prisoner of war exchanges which had existed previously and the

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    feelings of resentment soon turned to animosity as conditions went from mildly inconvenient to hellish nightmares. This will become apparent when given the history of the prison camps and examples of two of the worst offenders - Confederate led Andersonville in the South and Union run Elmira to the North. These fiendish prisons and their practices would leave a wound as catastrophic to the soul as the Minie ball was to the body. This invisible wound is known as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

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    “Red Cap” Book Report

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    The novel Red Cap is about a young boy who joins the army during the Civil War to help protect his beliefs. It is a common tale but each boy has his own story. This historical fiction by G. Clifton Wisler displays Ransom J. Powell’s story in an entertaining and informational manner. This book has no dull moments and beautifully shows the ugly truth about boys fighting in the Civil War and the life of the prisoners of war during this time period. Ransom is thirteen years old when he joins the army

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